Nathan Cone

Director of Marketing & Community Engagement

Texas Public Radio’s Director of Marketing and Community Engagement has been with the organization since 1995.  Nathan began at TPR working on classical music station KPAC 88.3 FM, as host of “Tuesday Night at the Opera.”  He soon learned the ropes on KSTX 89.1 FM, and volunteered to work practically any shift that came his way, on either station. Since then he has worked in nearly every capacity on the radio before moving into Marketing and Digital Media.

A native of Spring, Texas, Nathan began his broadcasting career while studying at San Antonio’s Trinity University, where he majored in Communication, with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.  At Trinity University’s KRTU, he was a student manager, serving as Jazz Program Director and Operations Manager.  Nathan graduated with a B.A. in Communication from Trinity University with minors in Communication Management and Art/Art History.

Currently, Nathan enjoys studying classic and contemporary films, especially those of the late director Stanley Kubrick.  He's the curator of Texas Public Radio's popular summer film series, Cinema Tuesdays.  He’s a musical omnivore, with a house full of classical, rock, and jazz compact discs and LPs. His favorite classical composer is Beethoven. His favorite jazz performer is Miles Davis, his favorite rock band is The Beatles, and his favorite film is Singin' in the Rain, which he enjoys watching with his wife and two children.

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Home Video
4:03 pm
Tue December 14, 2010

Une Brève Rencontre: Mademoiselle Chambon

Sandrine Kiberlain as Véronique.
Kino Lorber

It’s not the music of Rachmaninoff, but that of Sir Edward Elgar that informs the brief encounter depicted in "Mademoiselle Chambon."  The music, performed by the titular character in this Cesar-winning (Best Adapted Screenplay) film, appropriately communicates the longing for human connection and experience that draws Jean (Vince

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DVD Reviews
1:55 pm
Tue November 30, 2010

See The Music, Hear The Pictures, With "Fantasia"

©Disney. All rights reserved.

Whenever I’m asked to name my favorite Disney movie, I usually hesitate for a moment before answering “Fantasia.”  Not because my love for the film is any less than, say, Dumbo or Bambi, but because “Fantasia” is so strikingly different than any Disney film before or since, except for—you guessed it—"Fantasia 2000.”

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Movies
2:39 pm
Fri October 15, 2010

"The Alamo" At 50

MGM

"The Alamo" is celebrating a milestone. Fifty years ago this month, John Wayne's version of Texas' struggle for independence made its way to the big screen.  "The Alamo" was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and won one Oscar, for Best Sound.  To celebrate its 50th anniversary, the caretakers of the Alamo, the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, organized a special screening of the film at San Antonio's IMAX Rivercenter Theater on Friday, October 8.  

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Community
10:00 am
Tue September 21, 2010

Santikos, Eva's Heroes Partner For Sensory-Friendly Screenings

Courtesy Photo

Going to the movies is a part of most of our lives. But for many families with special needs, heading out to see the latest blockbuster is not an option. 

In the movie business, bigger is better, and the local cineplex features an explosion of bewildering options designed to overwhelm the senses.  For most of us, that’s what makes the movies fun – but for others, it can be too much to take.

Vivian Edens is a San Antonio mom whose son, Hunter, has Asperger Syndrome, a disorder on the autism spectrum.

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Review
4:03 pm
Sat July 10, 2010

Blu-ray Review: "The Red Shoes"

Moira Shearer in "The Red Shoes."
Courtesy of the Criterion Collection.

"The Red Shoes," the rapturous 1948 British film by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, is not just a great backstage film, it’s about the burning hunger that great artists have within them to create. In fact, "The Red Shoes" even goes as far as to suggest that art is something worth dying for.  In the freshly post-war England, this must have been a daring thematic choice.  After all, citizens for years had been dying for crown and country, and now, for dance?  But for the artists of "The Red Shoes," dance they must. 

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TPR Cinema
12:12 pm
Mon May 10, 2010

Richard Linklater On His Dreamy "Waking Life"

© 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment.

Are we wake-walking through our dreams, or sleep-walking through life? Or is it the reverse?

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Arts & Culture
9:48 am
Wed April 21, 2010

Girl In A Coma "On The Record" About Their Influences

Phanie Diaz, Nina Diaz, and Jenn Alva.
Josh Huskin

Onstage at the South By Southwest festival in Austin last month, Girl in a Coma played to a packed house at a club on Sixth Street with a special guest, Cherie Currie, co-founder with Joan Jett of the iconic late seventies all-female band, The Runaways.  Girl in a Coma’s bassist Jenn Alva says it was a real “rock star” moment for her.

“I guess we really never think about ‘Oh, we’re so cool,’ but when we were the backup band for her, we just felt like, ‘YEAH!,” says Alva. 

Drummer Phanie Diaz, laughing, pipes in, “Yeah, Jenn’s lips naturally snarled!”

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Movie Interviews
2:39 pm
Wed March 17, 2010

SXSW 2010: "Citizen Architect" Documents Rural Design Program

L to R: Sara Ann Mockbee, Jack “Jay” Sanders, and Sam Wainwright Douglas, the filmmakers behind Citizen Architect.
Nathan Cone

   

In the mid-1990s, Samuel “Sambo” Mockbee, founded the Rural Studio, a radical educational design/build program in poverty-stricken Hale County, Alabama. 

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SXSW
1:06 pm
Wed March 17, 2010

SXSW 2010: Paul Gordon, "The Happy Poet"

Bill (Paul Gordon) frets over the prices of healthy ingredients.
St. Chris Productions/Cinema Libre Studio

A sweet comedy about a sad sack poet trying to open a “mostly vegetarian” food stand, writer/director/actor Paul Gordon says "The Happy Poet" is also about "kindness and generosity versus looking out for yourself and doing what you need to do to get by." In the film, Bill (Gordon) finds trying to stay true to his convictions and make ends meet to be tougher than he expected.  

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SXSW
12:06 pm
Wed March 17, 2010

Opera Singer Who Faced Discrimination at UT-Austin in 1957 Profiled in Documentary, "When I Rise"

L to R: Rochelle Small, a student of Ms. Conrad’s, Barbara Smith Conrad, Michelle Thomas of AT&T. AT&T helped finance the production of "When I Rise."
Nathan Cone

In 1957, Barbara Smith Conrad was studying music at the University of Texas in Austin. She was cast as Dido in a student production of Henry Purcell’s opera "Dido and Aeneas." 

Two weeks before the curtain, Conrad learned that she would not be singing the role of Dido, because a state congressman had objected to an African-American woman being cast opposite a white leading man in a romantic role.  

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