Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra.

Ways to Connect

Norma Martinez

Dan Guerrero is an activist, a producer, and a performer.  His one-man show “Gaytino: Made in America” is a journey through his life, Chicano history, and gay activism.   TPR’s Norma Martinez had a chance to talk with the 76-year-old actor and his journey as a Latino LGBT activist. 

Lorne Matalon

This week on Fronteras: 

  •  Increasing danger for journalists covering organized crime across the border in Mexico.
  •  Environmentalists file against the U.S. government claiming President Trump’s border wall will harm endangered species.
  •   Are confederate monuments a symbol of racism?
  •  Performer and social activist Irma Herrera makes the case for respecting the pronunciation of a person’s name.
  •  For refugee students, getting through school can be tough.  That’s why a Dallas couple says they’re helping kids in their neighborhood.

 

Norma Martinez

A person’s name can be a point of contention, especially when it’s pronounced incorrectly.  If your name is long, perhaps you shorten it.  Or if you are Hispanic, perhaps you don’t mind an Anglicized version…take “peh-REZ” instead of “PEH-rez.”

TPR’s Norma Martinez spoke to writer, performer, and social activist Irma Herrera, whose one-woman show “Why Would I Mispronounce My Own Name” encourages people to embrace the names with which they were blessed. 


Al Ortiz

  

This week on Fronteras:  

 

 

  •  Harris County votes to stay out of the SB4 lawsuit despite vocal citizen protests.
  •  An Iraqi national who came here for a better life and helped the U.S. military during the war faces deportation in New Mexico.
  •   An exhibit in San Diego highlights items precious to refugees who fled their war torn nations.
  •  San Antonians get a new look at a huge rediscovered mosaic by a Mexican artist that had not been in plain sight until recently.

 

DANIEL SALINAS / LAS CRUCES HIGH SCHOOL

This week on Fronteras: 

  • Residents along the U.S.-Mexico border have water that is not fit for drinking or even washing clothes.
  •   Many pregnant rural New Mexicans live more than 60 miles away from a safe place to deliver their babies.
  •   In Austin, U-T students play a vital role in helping refugee children make their transition to America.
  • The state of Texas wants to move the sanctuary cities lawsuit from San Antonio federal court to Austin.
  • Experiencing the art of Mexican fine dining.  It’s a pricey new trend

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