Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra.

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Norma Martinez

Tejanos are historically known as the early Spanish settlers who lived in what is now Texas back in the 1600s.  Tejanos also played a role in the fight for Texas independence.  Today, Tejanos are considered the descendants of the early Spanish settlers and the indigenous Mexican population.  Though Tejanos have had a constant presence in the region for centuries, their role in Texas history isn’t as celebrated as other figures in Texas history, including the heroes of the Alamo – Travis, Crockett, and Bowie being the most famous. 

In 2016, a forgotten remnant of Tejano history was literally unearthed in San Antonio.  TPR's Norma Martinez had a chance to talk with Rudi Rodriguez, president and founder of TexasTejano.com, about the discovery.

Norma Martinez

Tejanos are historically known as the early Spanish settlers who lived in what is now Texas back in the 1600s.  Tejanos also played a role in the fight for Texas independence.  Today, Tejanos are considered the descendants of the early Spanish settlers and the indigenous Mexican population.  Though Tejanos have had a constant presence in the region for centuries, their role in Texas history isn’t as celebrated as other figures in Texas history, including the heroes of the Alamo – Travis, Crockett, and Bowie being the most famous. 

In 2016, a forgotten remnant of Tejano history was literally unearthed in San Antonio.  TPR's Norma Martinez had a chance to talk with Rudi Rodriguez, president and founder of TexasTejano.com, about the discovery.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

  

This week on Fronteras: 

  •  Across the U.S., the Latino high school dropout rate is lower than it’s ever been.
  •  Reparations and restoration of a stolen totem pole located at the University of New Mexico.
  •  Cultural appropriation or appreciation?  The story behind the writings of Amado Muro.

 

Amado Muro was a writer who told the stories of the downtrodden and forgotten.  He is considered by some a great Mexican writer, despite the fact that Amado Muro was a white man from Cleveland – Chester Seltzer.  He married a Mexican woman and adopted her name, Amada Muro, as a pseudonym.  A newspaperman, Chester frequently traveled the U.S. and Mexico to live with the people whose lives he recreated on paper. 

Robert Seltzer is Chester Seltzer’s son.  His book, “Amado Muro and Me:  A Tale of Honesty and Deception” shares his memories as a 10-year-old of his father.    He says his father’s preferred mode of travel during his outings was freight train. 

Amado Muro was a writer who told the stories of the downtrodden and forgotten.  He is considered by some a great Mexican writer, despite the fact that Amado Muro was a white man from Cleveland – Chester Seltzer.  He married a Mexican woman and adopted her name, Amada Muro, as a pseudonym.  A newspaperman, Chester frequently traveled the U.S. and Mexico to live with the people whose lives he recreated on paper. 

Robert Seltzer is Chester Seltzer’s son.  His book, “Amado Muro and Me:  A Tale of Honesty and Deception” shares his memories as a 10-year-old of his father.    He says his father’s preferred mode of travel during his outings was freight train. 

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