Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra.

Ways to Connect

Texas Public Radio

Charles “Charlie” Duke is a New Braunfels resident who has just happened to have walked on the moon. 

my_southborough via Creative Commons

This week on Fronteras:   

·         A federal judge rejects requests by federal agents to detain prisoners while their immigration status is checked.

·         San Diego leaders get a direct say in Mexican legislation pertaining to immigration.

·         What schools can and can’t do to accommodate students practicing their religious faiths.

·         Four UTSA students cross the Gulf of Mexico to Cuba - thanks to their forward thinking teacher.


 

·         The far reaching legacy of the young Texas singer known as Selena.  She died 22 years ago.

Will Mederski

 

This week on Fronteras:   

 

·         The U.S. Border Patrol enlists Trans-Pecos Pipeline workers to help catch drug smugglers.

 

·         The Department of Homeland Security is accepting bids to build President Trump’s proposed U.S. –Mexico Border Wall.

NASA

  

We're barely into Spring, but scientists are looking ahead to the Fall, when the moon will pass across the face of the sun and cause a solar eclipse.  Eclipses aren’t that rare…they happen about once a year.  NASA research astrophysicist Nicholeen Viall says the one in August is especially remarkable for the United States. 

Spring Equinox 2017

Mar 21, 2017
NASA

  

  

March 20 was the first day of Spring.  And other than promises of wildflowers and Spring allergies, the Equinox brings with it an astronomical event that only happens twice a year. 

Nicholeen Viall is a research astrophysicist with NASA.  She explains why the equinox is so unique.  “Yeah, so Equinox means in Latin 'equal day and equal night,' and that’s exactly what happened today.  The day and the night are of equal length, and that only happens twice a year – the Fall Equinox and the Spring Equinox.”

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