Paul Flahive

Producer - "The Source"

Paul Flahive is the producer for Texas Public Radio's award winning live, call-in program, "The Source." He has worked in public radio on and off since he before graduating from the University of Iowa with a degree in journalism and political science. While there he worked for the local public radio station, WSUI/KSUI, as a production assistant on their show "Talk of Iowa" as well as a reporter and host for weekend programs. 

Paul's love of the audio feature led him east to work for the Third Coast International Audio Festival as an assistant, which was part of Chicago Public Radio at the time. From there he moved to Alaska to run a journalism-based, after-school program for teenagers called the Alaska Teen Media Institute. Taking a break from full-time journalism, he ran an outreach program for homeless youth and victims of human trafficking for Covenant House Alaska.

A quick tour as show runner for the live show Arctic Entries led him back to radio.

As producer of "The Source," Paul was honored with two 2015 Lone Star Awards from the Houston Press Club, one for Best Talk Program and the other for Best Public Affairs Segment.

Ways To Connect

Allan Ajifo http://bit.ly/1pr45xg / cc

Every day there are 5,000 new brain injuries in the United States.  What does it feel like to go through the struggle of brain injury? Clark Elliott kept detailed notes about his recovery from concussion. What appeared externally to emergency medical professionals and loved ones to be a minor car accident, resulting in minor head injuries, turned out to be far more and deprived Elliot of basic functions.

Derek Key http://bit.ly/1FHbTgw / cc

The 44th annual Texas Folklife Festival arrives this weekend bringing with it 40 cultural groups all celebrating their diverse traditions.

Among the varied exhibitors are several who maintain the old customs of a bygone era. Blacksmithing and traditional bread making are two of the most popular exhibitions at the festival with crowds three deep observing their demonstrations.

What is it about the old patterns of life and their customs that intrigue us today? Why continue to learn these--some would say--antiquated techniques?

Guests:

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio's B-Cycle bike share program has seen some hard times. The upstart nonprofit has an intricate network of bike docks and over 400 bicycles maintained by a staff of less than 10.  Recently, The Source discussed the expanding network and its struggle to continue growth with a volunteer executive director, zero corporate sponsors, and little money for administrative costs. 

Trista Eudaily

The difference between San Antonio's marketplace of grocery options and that of Big Sister Dallas, is drastic. Dallas has one of the more competitive grocery markets in the country with big chains like Kroger, Albertsons, and Wal-Mart all grabbing at consumer dollars. Meanwhile San Antonio has only one mainstay grocery chain, H-E-B. 

Sure, San Antonio has a Wal-Mart presence as well as a couple of Whole Foods Markets, but you would be hard pressed to find someone arguing that H-E-B doesn't reign supreme in the Alamo City.  

Paul Flahive, Texas Public Radio

San Antonio's San Pedro Springs Park, the second oldest city park in the United States, is getting some needed updates.

The city is spending $1.8 million to create a perimeter trail with LED lighting, additional signage and monument walls.  The improvements were identified by residents in the 2013 Master Plan update.

City Archeologist Kay Hines says the changes will make the park more inviting.

Pages