Randy Anderson

Classical Music Director & Host

Randy was Texas Public Radio's Classical Music Director and the longest-serving employee in Texas Public Radio's history. He hosted the very first airshift on KPAC when the station went on the air at 90.9 FM in San Antonio back in November, 1982.

Randy started his career in classical broadcasting at KMFM in the mid-70s, working with one of KPAC's founders, B.J. McClain. The overnight shift was the only full-time job when KPAC first started in 1982 and he was happy to take it.

Randy's first love is painting; he enjoys portraits, landscapes and still lifes, and he spends much of his free time in front of an easel. Great music is a perfect complement to his love for painting and Randy spent years trying to find the perfect instrument. The piano came close, but he eventually realized that his best instrument is a turntable or CD player (or digital library).

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KPAC blog: The Piano
9:43 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Be Careful What You Wish For: Schubert Gets Published, But There Is A Caveat

Franz Schubert a year before his death.
Wikipedia

Franz Schubert, incredibly talented and poor as a church mouse, wanted the chance to make a decent living from his music, and finally, near the end of his life, he got publishers interested. The down side was that his works were to be dictated by what would sell, and Schubert found his outlets wanted simple music that would sell rather than the big Sonata's that he was interested in.

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KPAC Blog
1:05 am
Sat December 1, 2012

KPAC's 30th Anniversary: 30 Years, 30 Musical Moments

Glenn Gould's 1981 recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations.

In 1982 I was pushed into a chair in front of a microphone to back announce Bach's "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3."  Back then, KPAC was brand new, and had four turntables, reel to reel machines, and a small staff. With no university or college to support us, bringing classical music to San Antonio was a gamble from the get - go. Here are some of my favorite musical moments of the last three decades.

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KPAC blog: The Piano
1:11 pm
Fri November 30, 2012

On The Piano: Size Isn't Everything For Schubert's 'Impromptus'

Caricature of singer Johann Michael Vogl (left) and composer Franz Schubert (right). The caption (in German) reads: Michael Vogl and Franz Schubert go out for battle and victory.
: Original resides at the Historic Museum of the City of Vienna

Franz Schubert had great friends, and he needed them. His father wanted him to teach school, but Franz was built to compose music, and what started as a family hobby turned into an all consuming passion. Giving up his teaching job, Schubert turned to his friends, and with their help he was allowed, slowly and painfully, to become the artist he knew himself to be.

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KPAC blog: The Piano
10:00 am
Sat November 24, 2012

The American Way On 'The Piano'

Dixie Flag Company

This country is always in motion, or as one shipping company calls it "moving at the speed of business." Before the question of slavery became a civil war, American's enjoyed their minstrel shows, and after the conflagration, touring minstrel shows were once again one of this country's favorite pastimes.

This Sunday on "The Piano," music that has many fathers, music that comes together, ferments a bit and becomes something new - different and distinctly American.

KPAC blog: The Piano
1:03 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Beethoven Pushes The Envelope

Artur Schnabel
Wikipedia

In the 3 sonatas of Opus 10, Ludwig van Beethoven was making a statement about his pianistic abilities, and one thing he knew that would certainly attract attention was contrast. The composer asks for double fortes, throws in unexpected rests, and invents the heroic funeral movement that he would exploit in future symphonies. This is all in the third sonata in D Major.

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KPAC blog: The Piano
10:00 am
Fri November 9, 2012

When Beethoven Became The Man: A New World Of Sound And Fury With The Opus 10

listal.com

Arrogant, willful and brusque, not paying attention to how he dressed or even to combing his hair, Ludwig van Beethoven wasn't a man cut out for high society. Luckily in Vienna, the upper crust loved and understood music, and with that introduction, Beethoven was exactly in the right place.

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KPAC Blog
3:45 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

KPAC's 30th Anniversary: A Dream Became Reality in 1982

Randy Anderson & B.J. McClain

During this 30th year anniversary, I have had several people ask me if it has felt like thirty years, and the answer is yes and no. When I think back to all the improvements to the station and the additions to the library it does feel like three decades, but in time spent presenting this great music, it hasn’t seemed that long at all.

Another question that comes up is, ‘What was it like to get the station on the air?’

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KPAC Blog
4:23 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Remembering Glenn Gould -- Again

When my wife got home, I showed her the new book "Remembering Glenn Gould" by Colin Eatock, and she remarked “Didn't you have every book about him already”? She had a point there. I thought I had every book and the fact that a new title would be published thirty years after his death and it would be anticipated is a bit different.

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DVD Review
11:00 am
Thu May 17, 2012

DVD Review: "Girl On A Motorcycle"

Kino Lorber, Inc.

The 1960s and 70s were a time of great experimentation and revolt. New and different were in, and young musicians, artists and filmmakers’ battle cry was “why the hell not?” In a similar vein, a Parisian film maker hired a race driver to tear across Paris in the early morning in a Ferrari at speeds up to 120 mph with a 35mm camera strapped to the hood. In that same go for broke manner the producers of the film “The Girl on a Motorcycle” approached their task. 

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Home Video
9:22 am
Mon February 6, 2012

Burn It, Blue!

Warner Archive

If you collect DVDs, you probably come across titles that are no longer in print. Netflix won’t rent these, and looking for them online can give you a case of sticker shock--prices can be 8 to 10 times what they cost new. The problem is money: studios gear up for production, and to recoup their investment they have to sell lots of units of a popular film to make a profit. This means that titles with limited commercial value usually don’t reach the market.

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