Randy Anderson

Classical Music Director & Host

Randy was Texas Public Radio's Classical Music Director and the longest-serving employee in Texas Public Radio's history. He hosted the very first airshift on KPAC when the station went on the air at 90.9 FM in San Antonio back in November, 1982.

Randy started his career in classical broadcasting at KMFM in the mid-70s, working with one of KPAC's founders, B.J. McClain. The overnight shift was the only full-time job when KPAC first started in 1982 and he was happy to take it.

Randy's first love is painting; he enjoys portraits, landscapes and still lifes, and he spends much of his free time in front of an easel. Great music is a perfect complement to his love for painting and Randy spent years trying to find the perfect instrument. The piano came close, but he eventually realized that his best instrument is a turntable or CD player (or digital library).

Haocheng Zhang
OPUS 3 ARTISTS

Haochen Zhang, gold medal-winning pianist in the 13th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, will be performing at Ayers Hall at Texas Lutheran University on Monday, March 25 at 7 p.m.

KPAC's Randy Anderson spoke to Mr. Zhang about his experiences in Fort Worth, touring, and the music on next Monday's program.

"The competition meant a lot to me. [Now] I get to spend so much time touring, and it’s a very maturing experience for me, mentally and spiritually." -- Haochen Zhang

davidfinckleandwuhan.com

The San Antonio Chamber Music Society is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year and what a great reminder of what chamber music is all about than when husband and wife duo David Finckel (cello) and Wu Han (piano) performed at Temple Bethel last Sunday.

They were recently named "Musicians of the Year" by Musical America in 2012. Some concerts you know are going to be great just by walking in the hall, and this was one of them.

SAIPC

It is nerve racking to compete head to head. In sports this is a fairly normal part of the job, but when it comes to artists, especially pianists, it is a big shift from the norm.

A musician's routine is quiet and predicable. You generally practice alone and it is here that you polish and learn, working on your fingering, phrasing and the little things that mean so much to you, but might not be even noticed by an audience.

unknown

I remember reading a legendary performer once say that no two performances are alike. When I starting studying the piano I recorded some of my practice sessions to hear how I was playing without the distraction of making the music.

The great musician was right, not only were all my repetitions different, I couldn't make my performances sound the same if I tried.

Wikipedia

In the hurly-burly of a Piano competition there are selections that can make or break the chances of a competitor; pieces so difficult or dense that only a master musician can make them work for the audience and more importantly, the judges.

On the Piano this Sunday, we continue with music from the 2012 San Antonio International Piano Competition where two of the pianists "go big" in an effort to convince the judges that they have what it takes to be worthy of the gold medal.

Debussy

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