Ron Moore

Classical Music Host

Ron has always lived in two musical worlds: jazz and classical. Although born in Los Angeles, he has lived in San Antonio most of his life.

Hearing jazz while growing up at home, Ron discovered classical music as a child at the San Antonio Public Library; his favorite composers have always been Miles Davis and Brahms.

Ron has bought, sold, or broadcast music for a living for most of his adult life, all while writing novels, plays and essays on the side. Prior to joining TPR, Ron worked at Doubleday in New York and Sound Warehouse in San Antonio.

His enthusiasm for music has been captured forever on the "Ruff-Mitchell Duo Play With Dizzy Gillespie" - the screams that endlessly repeat in the background are his.

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Metropolitan Opera
12:03 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Riccardo Zandonai’s 'Francesca da Rimini,' Live

Finally together... in hell.
Gustave Doré Wikimedia Commons

Few single cantos of poetry have ever given as much to the world as Dante’s Canto V from the Inferno and the brief telling at the close of the love, death and afterlife of Francesca da Rimini.

Beginning with Dante in 1308 among the painters, musicians, painters , playwrights inspired by the tale can be included: Mercadante, Leigh Hunt, Ingres, Rodin, Rossini, Rachmaninoff, Doré (whose illustrations are reprinted to this day), Foote and of course Tchaikovsky, whose tone poem has done much to popularize the theme . 

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KPAC Blog: Metropolitan Opera
9:25 am
Thu March 7, 2013

The Met Presents Verdi's Epic Masterpiece 'Don Carlo'

A scene from Act III of Verdi's "Don Carlo"
Ken Howard Metropolitan Opera

Giuseppi Verdi's "Don Carlo" was a Behemoth, a lumbering monster. It featured variant openings, duets and trios and choruses to burn, ballet music that now only exists as a separate concert work, and most importantly, a great psychological/musical narrative frame -- the reason for all the elaboration and development.

What most of us know begins in a tomb in Spain and builds out an old and new subtext of European history, the battle of reactionary politics and the spirit of the Reformation. This background weaves this ideological struggle into a love story of great power.

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KPAC Blog: Metropolitan Opera
10:17 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Richard Wagner’s Apotheosis, 'Parsifal'

Jonas Kaufman stars in the title role of Wagner's 'Parsifal'
Metropolitan Opera

Richard Wagner’s "Parsifal," his final opera, was created in parallel with his greatest creations including "The Ring" and "Tristan." It took him just over 30 years and several revisions before it was finally presented in 1882.

It is viewed as his most refined and elaborate work and it at times leaves people feeling that it is too profound to even applaud. In a comic twist, this bothered the composer; when Wagner would applaud a certain scene he would be hushed by members of the audience.

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KPAC Blog: Metropolitan Opera
11:54 am
Thu February 21, 2013

Freedom-Loving Women And Madmen In Bizet’s 'Carmen'

Anita Rachvelishvili features as Carmen in Bizet's classic.
Metropolitan Opera

I couldn’t have timed better the decision to replay my all time favorite Masterpiece Theatre Classic, "The Forsyte Saga," than the week the Metropolitan would broadcast its "Carmen." I had never really considered the fact that the two works and their heroine’s were so close; more sisters than cousins.

The similarities are striking

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KPAC Blog: Metropolitan Opera
12:31 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Verdi's 'Rigoletto' Set In Las Vegas Showtime

This production of Verdi's "Rigoletto" is staged in 1960's Las Vegas
Metropolitan Opera

Lasting works that are so much a part of our lives and the general culture have often had the most improbable origins; it is one of music's greatest ironies.

The arduous birth of Wagner’s "The Ring" is the stuff of legends, and decades of work, sacrifice and immense debt. Berlioz' "Les Troyens" was a desperate, singular throw of the dice urged on by his correspondence with Liszt's mistress and his lifelong love of Virgil. But what about Verdi’s overwhelmingly popular "Rigoletto"? What happened there?

Ever evolving...

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KPAC Blog: Metropolitan Opera
11:51 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Donizetti's Comedic Elixir For Love, 'L'Elisir d'Amore'

Anna Netrebko stars as Adina with Erwin Schrott as Dulcamara, the provider of the love-inducing elixir
Metropolitan Opera

After more than 180 years (1832), audiences are still laughing through their tears at Gaetano Donizetti’s comic masterwork, The Elixir of Love.

It is a commonplace to say that comedy is more difficult than tragedy, but what about an opera that walks that delicate boundary between the two?

Taking as a starting part the most common of themes -- provincial love and its difficulties -- Donizetti achieves something almost miraculous.

Opening Night in New York

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KPAC blog: Metropolitan Opera
11:56 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Comedy Magic With Rossini’s 'Le Comte Ory'

Juan Diego Florez as Ory in Rossini's 'Le Comte Ory'
Metropolitan Opera

There are essentially two approaches to the supreme expression of opera, both of them dealing with what would seem to be the impossible.

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Arts & Culture
8:41 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Marian Anderson, A Legend Revisited

Portrait of Marian Anderson
Carl van Vechten, Public Domain Wikimedia Commons

Depending on your age, the name Marian Anderson can belong to the realm of indelible and haunting experience, or mysterious legend.

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KPAC blog: Metropolitan Opera
12:27 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

Puccini Gets Real In 'La Rondine' [With Video]

Kristine Opolais in 'La Rondine'
Metropolitan Opera

There are essentially two views of Puccini. To his admirers he is one of the most beloved, most lyrical and at times moving composers of the modern period -- and successful beyond anyone’s wildest imaginings.

Detractors, however, have a different view. For all the dramatic (or melodramatic) force of his music and his undeniable lyric gift, finally he is enthralled by the mob. His lucrative populism is almost an embarrassment, and the joke he once told about his talent: "God touched me, but with his little finger," is perhaps, a truer saying than his fans care to admit.

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KPAC blog: Metropolitan Opera
12:32 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

'Maria Stuarda,'One Queen Too Many At Metropolitan Opera

Mary in happier days
Wikipedia

Whether you believe that Mary Stuart was the most amoral, conniving and ruthless female of Elizabethan England or the most tragic victim of overwhelming and relentless circumstances and doomed to tragic grandeur, her life is one of the great historical dramas.

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