Ron Moore

Classical Music Host

Ron has always lived in two musical worlds: jazz and classical. Although born in Los Angeles, he has lived in San Antonio most of his life.

Hearing jazz while growing up at home, Ron discovered classical music as a child at the San Antonio Public Library; his favorite composers have always been Miles Davis and Brahms.

Ron has bought, sold, or broadcast music for a living for most of his adult life, all while writing novels, plays and essays on the side. Prior to joining TPR, Ron worked at Doubleday in New York and Sound Warehouse in San Antonio.

His enthusiasm for music has been captured forever on the "Ruff-Mitchell Duo Play With Dizzy Gillespie" - the screams that endlessly repeat in the background are his.

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KPAC blog: Metropolitan Opera
10:10 am
Fri January 11, 2013

Giuseppi Verdi’s 'Il Trovatore' - The Vindication Of Opera

Scene from the Met's performance of "Il Trovatore," the Anvil Chorus.
Ken Howard

One of opera's most comical and telling facts was that Giuseppe Verdi was poised at the height of his middle period -- between "Rigoletto" and "La Traviata"  -- to first tackle nothing less than "King Lear," until finally deciding on "Il Trovatore" (The Troubadour).

Could any two themes be less alike?

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KPAC blog: Metropolitan Opera
12:24 pm
Thu January 3, 2013

Hector Berlioz' Inspired Masterpiece, 'Les Troyens'

The Greeks and their surprise in Troy
Wikipedia

With a mixture of trepidation and excitement, Hector Berlioz, the composer, critic and conductor, stood poised to lay aside many of the usual tasks and distractions of his life and give himself up to the dream of a lifetime: The composition of an epic on antique themes inspired by Virgil's "Aeneid," Les Troyens.

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KPAC blog: Metropolitan Opera
2:16 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

The Barber Of Seville: You Can Understand Rossini!

Rodion Pogossov as Figaro
Metropolitan Opera

It was habit in the nineteenth and early twentieth century to present operas, whatever their original language, in the language of the host country. Playbills of the past are filled with references toWagner's Il Sigfrido, or Mozart’s Il Fluto Magico, or Figaro's Hochzeit. The idea was, of course, to fill the seats. This is especially important in comedy, because what was the point if nobody got the jokes!

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KPAC blog: Saturday at the Met
11:03 am
Thu December 13, 2012

The Met Stage Is Full Of Egypt With Verdi's Spectacle, 'Aida'

Liudmyla Monastyrska as Aida.
Metropolitan Opera

There are so many genres of opera. There are the exquisite chamber operas that are close to plays like Strauss’ "Capriccio" of Gluck’s chamber operas. There are the operas of morality or ideology like Beethoven’s "Fidelio" or Mozart’s "Idomeneo." Some works highlight verismos raw emotions and atonal expressionism, decadent excesses like Berg’s "Lulu" or the opera of scandal, like "Salome" and the late romantic opera as epic poetry, "The Ring." The list goes on and on.

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KPAC blog: Saturday Afternoon At The Opera
1:27 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

Verdi’s Indestructible Masked Ball: 'Un Ballo in Maschera'

Giuseppe Verdi
Wikipedia

Few, if any, operas can bear comparison with the gestation, preparation and final execution of Giuseppe Verdi’s "Un Ballo in Maschera." It is the work that definitively closes his middle period; preceded by "Traviata," "Rigoletto," and "Il Trovatore" and followed by his supreme masterworks "Don Carlo," "Aida," "Otello" and "Falstaff."

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KPAC blog: Saturday Afternoon At The Opera
5:47 pm
Thu November 29, 2012

The Season Finale: Franz Josef Haydn’s 'Orlando Paladino'

Franz Joseph Haydn
Wikipedia

At one time Franz Josef Haydn had the best and worst job in the world. From his earliest youth he had found his way into the employ of the Eszterhazy family. Once he settled in, and with the exception of the rare argument, this arrangement (1761-1802) continued into his final retirement from ill health. He started with Prince Paul Anton (Pal Antal 1711-1762) first as assistant Kapellemeister and then the top post. But after that patron’s death his real compositional life began.

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Arts & Culture
9:41 am
Tue November 27, 2012

KPAC's 30th Anniversary: 30 Great Vocal Recordings

Publicity photo of Maria Callas (1923 – 1977) as Violetta in La Traviata at the Royal Opera House (1958).
Credit Houston Rogers / Wikipedia

This month, KPAC is celebrating thirty years of broadcasting. Our hosts are having some fun sharing "30 lists" - artists, music, movies, and recordings you might enjoy, that help shape the sound of your classical oasis.

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KPAC blog: Saturday Afternoon At The Opera
11:48 am
Thu November 15, 2012

One Of The Greatest Operas Ever Written: Wagner’s 'Parsifal'

Richard & Cosima Wagner
Wikipedia

Richard Wagner’s Parsifal, his final opera, was created in parallel with his greatest creations including The Ring and Tristan. Beginning in the 1850’s, its prose and poetry was returned to over and over again in first and second drafts, and was finally orchestrated and presented in 1882; it occupied over a quarter century in Wagner’s creative life. The work was scored with the acoustics of the newly built Bayreuth in mind and has one of the oddest operatic history’s imaginable.

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Saturday Afternoon At The Opera
11:44 am
Thu November 8, 2012

One Of Giuseppe Verdi's Greatest, 'Don Carlo'

Wikipedia

There are essentially two versions of Don Carlo for Giuseppe Verdi. I don't mean that one is in French and the other Italian. Historians and musicologist are manic about the fact that this is untrue; however, there is a work, Don Carlos (francophone's are insistent on this), originally written in French for the Paris Opera that was so vast (5 hrs and change, they say), and it's richness so prodigal, that it obscured the works greatness.

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KPAC Blog
10:31 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Crazy Love, Massenet’s Thais

Credit Wikipedia Commons

If ever the term ‘opposites attract’ were applied to an opera, it should applied to Jules Massenet’s Thais. Two of the unlikeliest of characters will carry on an extended, obsessive and sublimated non-affair affair. It will inspire some of the composer’s most popular music, the Meditation for violin and orchestra, though the work as a whole has never quite become part of the repertory. It falls between two of his most well known works Werther and Cendrillion.

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