Ryan Poppe

News Reporter - Capitol

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

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Ryan Poppe

From private school vouchers to property tax reforms, now that the Texas Senate has cleared its requirement of passing a bill that licenses the existence of some state agencies, the game is on to pass the other priorities Gov. Greg Abbott outlined ahead of this summer’s special session.  

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Will a statewide ban on texting-while-driving replace ordinances already on the books in cities across Texas? 

University of Tennessee

University of Texas System regents announce they have selected a finalist to serve as the President of the University of Texas at San Antonio.  Dr. Taylor Eighmy replaces Ricardo Romo, who resigned in March.

For the past several months, UT regents have been scouring through the resumes of university presidents from across the country.   UT Vice Chancellor Steve Leslie says the board announced that Taylor Eighmy from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville will serve as UTSA’s next campus president.

Ryan Poppe

A federal judge in Austin heard arguments Thursday concerning the state’s anti-sanctuary cities law, just days after arguments were heard in San Antonio federal court.  

The multi-city lawsuit against the State of Texas asks that SB4, the anti-sanctuary cities law, be declared unconstitutional.  The suit was filed in federal court in San Antonio.  But the Texas Attorney General’s Office argued before Federal District Judge Sam Sparks in Austin that because the lawsuit involves state elected officials it should take place in the capitol city.

Joey Palacios / TPR

A federal judge is hearing arguments Monday from cities, counties and other organizations that want to prevent the implementation of a new Texas law banning sanctuary cities.

Plaintiffs claim the new sanctuary cities ban violates the U.S. Constitution by threatening free speech and equal protection. The ban allows local law enforcement to ask about the immigration status of people who are detained, even for something as routine as a traffic stop.

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