Ryan Poppe

News Reporter - Capitol

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

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Ryan Poppe

A new poll put out by the University of Texas and the Texas Tribune shows the number of Republican voters concerned about the possibility of voter fraud occurring during this election outweighs that of likely Democratic voters  in Texas.   

The Texas Tribune

Special agents with the Department of Public Safety are being used to locate an estimated 2,800 children who have been deemed by the state as at high-risk for abuse.  The DPS began assisting Child Protective Services in their efforts following a fiery meeting at the state capitol and a legislative ultimatum.

In the past two years, 171 Texas children have died from abuse and neglect while in the state’s care. And tempers flared Wednesday as state lawmakers discussed how to fix Texas’ broken child care system.

Photos by The Texas Tribune and Gage Skidmore

It’s no secret Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are two of the most disliked major party nominees to ever run for President. That has some Texans searching for other options…any options…when it comes to our next commander and chief. Austinite Kaia Tingley asked: “Can we vote for either Libertarian or Green Party candidates in Texas?”

Sundar1 / Wikimedia Commons

The Texas Department of Public Safety is considering a policy change to the state’s limited medical-marijuana law that would raise the fees for dispensaries and growers from $6,000 to $1.3-million dollars.   

At the end of 2015, the Public Safety Commission passed an initial set of rules, part of which set the rate that would be imposed on businesses wanting to become dispensaries and grow operations at $6,000.  This month, the state agency proposed raising that fee to $1.3 million dollars.

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