Ryan Poppe

News Reporter - Capitol

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary live in the Northwest Austin suburb of Jollyville. He enjoys spending time at many Austin's parks and outdoor areas with his son Luke and cycling along some of the area's bike trails.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from traditional French to modern Thai-cusine.

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Ryan E. Poppe

Members of a Texas House committee receive emotional testimony with regard to proposed legislation that would impose a statewide ban on texting while driving. Support for the measure at the State Capitol continues to build and even the governor indicated he could support a ban.

In 2011, Rick Perry, then the governor, vetoed a bill to ban texting while driving.

Ryan E. Poppe

Hundreds of people were on hand Wednesday at the State Capitol to witness the swearing in of San Antonio’s newest Senator, Democrat José Menéndez.

A crowd gathered in the chamber of the Texas Senate quickly became a who’s who of San Antonio officials, past and present, all in Austin to be part of Menendez’s move from the House to the Senate. He spent  14 years serving San Antonio in the Texas House.

Ryan E. Poppe

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and Friendswood Republican Sen. Larry Taylor, the head of the state Senate’s education committee, have identified six education-related bills to be fast-tracked through the Senate, but that priority list does not include a controversial bill that would legalize school choice programs in Texas.

Ryan E. Poppe

A bipartisan group of lawmakers in the Texas House announced they have an answer to the border security issues plaguing Texas’ southern border and it doesn’t involve a surge or the National Guard.  

Ryan E. Poppe

At the corner of Market and Laredo Streets in downtown San Antonio, tourists follow the arrows on a sign that points to internationally known tourist attractions, including the Alamo. There’s also a lone arrow pointing in the opposite direction, one that fewer follow. It directs visitors to the home of a Mexican who helped write Texas’ first constitution.

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