Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
9:51 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Warding Off Polar Bears? There's An App For That

A tranquilized subadult polar bear is in a net in 2007 in Churchill, Manitoba, known as the "polar bear capital of the world."
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:01 pm

Just in time for the release of the new iPhone, a man in Canada has found yet another new use for the cellphone — thwarting a polar bear attack.

Garett Kolsun says he used his cellphone to scare off a 400-pound polar bear on the attack, using the light from the handset to startle the animal long enough to allow his escape.

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The Two-Way
5:32 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Top Afghan Militant Reportedly Killed In U.S. Drone Strike

Protesters in Pakistan shout anti-U.S. slogans during a protest in July against drone strikes in Pakistan's tribal areas.
Arif Ali AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 5:58 pm

A senior leader of the al-Qaida-linked Haqqani network — considered one of the most dangerous factions fighting American troops in Afghanistan — has been killed in a U.S. drone strike over northwestern Pakistan, officials say.

Sangeen Zadran was among five people killed at a compound in the North Waziristan tribal region when a missile fired from a U.S. drone hit the building, Pakistani intelligence officials said.

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The Two-Way
3:43 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

State Department Orders U.S. Personnel Out Of Lebanon

Supporters of the Syrian regime demonstrate in front of the U.S. Embassy east of Beirut on Friday.
Hussein Malla Associated Press

The State Department has ordered all nonessential U.S. government personnel out of Lebanon and approved a voluntary evacuation of Turkey ahead of a possible strike on Syria.

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The Two-Way
1:26 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Deep In The Pacific, Scientists Discover Biggest Volcano On Earth

Tamu Massif 3D map
William Sager University of Houston

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 12:10 pm

The world's largest volcano has until now been lurking undiscovered in the depths of the Pacific Ocean, according to a team of scientists who identified the massive object and reported their findings in the latest issue of Nature Geoscience.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Antitrust Monitor Ordered For Apple Over E-Book Price Fixing

Amazon's Kindle e-reader. Apple has been ordered to submit to a monitor to ensure it doesn't fix prices on e-books in future.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:44 am

A federal judge who found Apple guilty of colluding with publishers in an e-book price-fixing scheme ordered the tech giant on Friday to modify its contracts and submit to oversight to make sure it doesn't happen again.

The injunction issued by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan against orders the iPad maker to hire an external compliance monitor for two years to supervise the company's antitrust compliance efforts, The Associated Press reports.

Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple says it plans to appeal.

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The Two-Way
5:39 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

German Police Raid Christian Sect For Alleged Child Abuse

View of the village of Klosterzimmern near Deiningen, Germany on Friday. The village is home to the religious community 'Zwoelf Staemme' ('Twelve Tribes').
Daniel Karmann EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:31 pm

Two communities affiliated with a U.S.-founded Christian sect have been raided by German police, who removed 40 children after allegations of abuse.

Officials say they acted after receiving evidence of ongoing child abuse at the two communities in Bavaria belonging to the Twelve Tribes, according to Germany's Spiegel Online.

According to the BBC, more than 100 officers were part of the operation to remove the children, who were placed in temporary foster homes.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Iran's President Wished Jews 'A Blessed Rosh Hashanah.' Or Did He?

Did Iranian President Hassan Rouhani tweet a greeting to the world's Jews on Rosh Hashana?
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 9:12 am

It sounded a bit far-fetched, and perhaps it was.

Iran's former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad denied the Holocaust and threatened to wipe Israel off the map. But his successor, President Hassan Rouhani, considered a relative moderate by contrast, has taken a somewhat softer tone. So, when Rouhani allegedly tweeted the following, it quickly became news:

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The Two-Way
10:14 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Fog Blamed For 100-Plus Vehicle Pileup In U.K.

Recovery workers vehicles back the front of the Sheppey crossing bridge after 100 or more vehicles were involved in a major road traffic incident in Sheppey, Kent, southeast England on Thursday.
Justin Tallis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 10:47 am

As many as 130 vehicles were involved in a massive pileup on a fog-covered bridge in Kent, England, that resulted in dozens of injuries along a major traffic artery.

Eight motorists suffered serious injuries in the morning rush-hour accident that closed down the A249 Sheppey Crossing, which is southeast of London.

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The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Scientists Demonstrate Leaner System For Quantum Encryption

Navajo encryption boxes seen at right in 2003 employ principles of quantum physics. The latest research has shown the ability to run larger networks with less such hardware.
Elise Amendola Associated Press

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 7:48 pm

Scientists have demonstrated the ability to scale-up an 'uncrackable' computer encryption system that utilizes quantum physics to ensure security.

The technique is based on information that is carried by photons, the basic particles of light. While it's been demonstrated on a small scale, the team headed by Andrew Shields and publishing in Nature says they've shown that up to 64 users can share a single photon detector, eliminating the need for each one to have such an (expensive) device.

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The Two-Way
3:01 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Senate Panel Passes Authorization For Force Against Syria

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., listens as the committee's ranking Republican, Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, speaks before Wednesday's vote.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 7:05 pm

A Senate panel has voted to approve a resolution giving President Obama the authority to carry out punitive strikes against Syria for its use of chemical weapons.

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved the authorization by a 10-7 vote, with one senator voting present. The measure must be passed by a vote of the full Senate to come into force. The vote is likely to take place next week.

The vote marks the first time lawmakers have voted to authorize military action since the October 2002 vote giving President George W. Bush authority to invade Iraq.

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