Shelley D. Kofler

News Director

Shelley Kofler is Texas Public Radio’s news director. She joined the San Antonio station in December 2014 and leads a growing staff that produces two weekly programs; a daily talk show, news features, reports and online content. Prior to TPR, Shelley served as the managing editor and news director at KERA in Dallas-Fort Worth, and the Austin bureau chief and legislative reporter for North Texas ABC affiliate WFAA-TV.

She has produced and moderated numerous, statewide political debates, including the gubernatorial debates in 2014 and those for U.S. Senate candidates in 2012.

Her interest in legislative policy includes knowledge about school finance, water and transportation issues. Her stories on the over-medication of foster children captured the attention of state officials who strengthened laws for the use of psychotropic drugs among children.

Shelley also worked with KERA on nationally televised programs.

Her radio and television work has been honored by the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters Association; the Houston Press Club, the Dallas Press Club and the Radio-Television Digital News Association, which has honored her with several prestigious Edward R. Murrow awards.

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In Dallas on Monday, Attorney General Greg Abbott defended a new state abortion law being challenged in federal court this week.

Unlike many places in America where Latinos are a relatively new minority group, Texas Hispanics were there before white Anglos. In some ways, having once been part of Mexico has lessened the tensions between whites and Latinos. But that's not always the case.

(For an extended version of this story, along with a gallery of images, visit KERA's website: Latino Roots Run Deeper In Texas.)

On Wednesday state lawmakers on the House Public Health Committee will consider screening newborns for congenital heart defects. The bill filed by Denton Republican Myra Crownover continues her efforts to expand genetic testing for babies.

District Judge John Dietz has ruled the Texas school finance system, which serves over 5 million public schoolchildren, is unconstitutional. 

“The court declares the school finance system  is not adequately funded and therefore fails to make suitable provision for the support and maintenance of the system,” Dietz said Monday, explaining one of the reasons he ruled against the state. 

Two SMU political science professors disagree on whether Governor Rick Perry’s call for a tax cut will sail through the legislature. We asked professors Cal Jillson and Matthew Wilson to watch the governor’s state-of-the state speech yesterday and tell us what impressed them.

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