Texas Water Symposium

Water, essential for life, is our most precious and valuable natural resource, but water supply is limited and under increasing pressure from a growing population.  How will we protect this resource and plan for a sustainable future?  There is a great need for a water-literate public; decisions being made today have far reaching and long lasting effects for our children and future generations.

The Texas Water Symposium series provides perspectives from policy makers, scientists, water resource experts and regional leaders.  Join us as we explore together, the complexity and challenges in providing water for Texans in this century.  Each session is free and open to the public.

The Texas Water Symposium is presented through a partnership with the Hill Country Alliance, Schreiner University, Texas Tech University and Texas Public Radio.

Difficult decisions lie ahead as urban areas demand more water, rural areas experience loss of spring flow, and our region faces increased challenges brought by population growth and drought. Are Central Texas’ water planning processes on track to balance the needs of its rural and urban users and protect the natural water resources that sustain our ecologic and economic health?

James Volosin / Hill Country Alliance

The Pedernales River runs 106 miles through the Hill Country before eventually joining the Colorado River at Lake Travis. Its catchment area—the land that drains into the river—touches 8 counties and covers more than 800,000 acres.

The basin provides habitat for numerous fish and wildlife, supports agricultural, ranching and hunting pursuits, and contributes 23% of the flow into Lake Travis, providing a critical source of drinking water for downstream users such as the City of Austin.

Schreiner University

As we struggle to meet water resource challenges, what is the proper role that government should play regarding land development and other traditionally unregulated issues, in order to protect stream flows and the private property rights of landowners? All are potentially impacted by water marketing and increased withdrawals from aquifers. Stay tuned for the Texas Water Symposium, presented by the Hill Country Alliance, Schreiner University, and Texas Tech University, and recorded on the campus of Schreiner University in Kerrville.

Removing one Cedar tree from your property can keep 40 gallons of water in the ground per day; that's 14,600 gallons per year of a resource that is becoming less and less available as much of the state continues to be in drought conditions.  This statistic was read off by Dr. Tom Arsuffi at the March 8th meeting of the Texas Water Symposium entitled Texas Springs: Making Connections between Groundwater, Surface Water, Science and Stewardship at the Llano Field Campus of Texas Tech University in Junction, Texas. 

The final panel discussion of the 2011-2012 Texas Water Symposium series discusses the Texas State Supreme Court ruling in Edwards Aquifer Authority vs. Day. The series is a joint project of Texas Tech University, Schreiner University, the Hill Country Alliance and Texas Public Radio. 

Moderating the panel discussion is Evan Smith, editor-in-chief and CEO of the Texas Tribune. On the panel are Russell Johnson and Tom Mason, attorneys from Austin and Greg Ellis an attorney in Houston. All three have experience in Texas water law.

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