Wendy Rigby

Bioscience and Medicine Reporter

Wendy Rigby is a San Antonio native who has worked as a journalist for more than 25 years. She spent two decades at KENS-TV covering health and medical news. Now, she brings her considerable background, experience and passion to Texas Public Radio.

Wendy has earned dozens of awards for medical reporting from various state and national organizations including the Texas Medical Association, the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, and the Dallas Press Club. She has been honored with two Emmy Awards from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

Wendy earned her Bachelor’s degree in Print and Broadcast Journalism from Trinity University in San Antonio. She graduated summa cum laude.

She lives in San Antonio with her husband. Wendy has two adult children and a menagerie of pets. She enjoys music, reading, watching movies, cross-stitching and travel.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the BioScience and Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, The John and Rita Feik Foundation, The John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

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The Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing of genetic testing for the health risk for 10 diseases. The Alzheimer’s Association says don’t count on it to tell you the risk of developing that particular memory-robbing disorder.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The Texas Department of State Health Services is expanding its recommendation for who needs to be tested for the Zika virus.

As the weather warms and mosquitoes are more plentiful, state health officials are casting a wider net to detect pregnant women who may be infected with the Zika virus.

Elizabeth Allen / University Health System

You've probably heard about the large numbers of people in South Texas who suffer from diabetes. But what does it mean if you are diagnosed as pre-diabetes?

TPR's Bioscience Medicine reporter Wendy Rigby interviewed Curtis Triplitt, Pharm.D., a researcher at the Texas Diabetes Institute on San Antonio's West Side. This is a transcript of that interview:

San Antonio Metropolitan Health District

Where you live in San Antonio has a bearing on how long you live.  Changing that kind of health inequity will take years.  It's a challenge the community is taking on.

Access to insurance has made headlines recently, but what determines people’s health is much more complex, including many of the circumstances of daily life.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

You've probably heard the phrase "it takes a village" to get things done. That may be true of treatment for high blood pressure, also called hypertension. It affects one in three adults. San Antonio’s University Health System is using the village approach to manage patients with this life-threatening chronic condition.

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