ACA Challenges: Language Translation & Insuring Native Americans

Oct 11, 2013

Fronteras: Volunteers in California are taking action to try to prevent Mexican immigrants from dying on their way to the U.S. The uninsured eligible for health care through the Affordable Care Act include millions who don't speak English well, which iss causing some challenges. Native Americans are exempt from ACA mandatory coverage requirement, which has some health professionals worried they could be left behind. Also, PBS’ new "Genealogy Road Show" takes a proud Texan through an emotional journey showing her family’s strong roots in Texas history.

Desert Humanitarians Leave Water for Traveling Migrants

Every two weeks a group of volunteers has been going out into the Imperial Valley to leave water for the migrants who try to cross the Mexico border in California's unforgiving desert. Fronteras reporter Adrian Florido accompanied the volunteers on a recent trip, and he filed this profile.

Native Americans At Higher Risk For Flu Complications

Health Departments in the Southwest are beginning to see some of the first flu cases of the season. Officials warn that there are many populations at higher risk for health complications for the flu. Tristan Ahtone  reports one high-risk group is Native Americans, but the reason why isn’t fully understood.

Language Barriers Cause Challenge For Health Care Outreach

The Affordable Care Act’s new insurance marketplaces are now open for business, but millions of eligible shoppers don’t speak much English, so signing up comes with extra challenges. From the Fronteras Desk in Phoenix, Jude Joffe-Block reports

Exemption To ACA Could Leave Many Native Americans Uninsured

Beginning Jan. 1, most Americans will be required to have health insurance or pay penalties under the Affordable Care Act. Native Americans are one of just a few groups that are exempt from the requirement. But as Tristan Ahtone reports, that exemption means the status-quo for a big part of Indian Country: High health disparities, and no access to care.

PBS’ Genealogy Roadshow Gives Texan Answers to Her Family’s Roots

PBS’ new Genealogy Roadshow is a twist on Antique Roadshow. The show uses history and science detective work to unveil fascinating stories of diverse Americans. The next Austin episode features a woman with a whole lot of Texas Pride—and strong ties to San Antonio.

Denise Steusloff told Texas Public Radio’s Crystal Chavez that she always wondered about her family’s true roots—and Genealogy Roadshow took her on the emotional journey of her life.