Could A 'Red Flag' Help Curb Gun Violence In Texas?

16 hours ago

Mass shootings in Texas at Sante Fe High School and in Sutherland Springs claimed a combined 37 lives. One shooter showed warning signs beforehand. The other seemingly did not

Now, Texas is considering the adoption of a so-called "red-flag" law as a way to prevent future gun violence.

The policy in question would allow family members, school or law enforcement officials to ask a court to temporarily restrict an individual's access to guns if he or she exhibits behavior constituting a red flag – any indication that they could be a danger to others or their own person.

Eleven states have already adopted red flag laws which can remove weapons for a few months or up to a year, depending on the state.

Although Texas Gov. Greg Abbott's plan for school safety suggests considering a similar approach, ultimately state lawmakers will decide whether or not to implement the policy. 

What kinds of behaviors are considered "red flags"? How are laws like this enforced? Do these laws challenge constitutional rights to due process and the Second Amendment?

What are lawmakers, educators and mental health professionals considering in regards to this proposed policy? Could implementing a red-flag law save lives and prevent future gun violence in Texas?  

Guests: 

"The Source" is a live call-in program airing Mondays through Thursdays from 12-1 p.m. Leave a voicemail in advance on the comment line at 210-615-8982. During the live show, call 210-614-8980, email thesource@tpr.org or tweet at @TPRSource. 

*Full audio for this interview will be available by 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 12

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