Fronteras
9:05 am
Fri December 13, 2013

Declining Fertility In America Worries Economists, Could Immigration Reform Offer A Solution?

A survey of Latinos in San Diego County finds that many face discrimination. Fewer Americans are choosing to have children. Some experts say this could have disastrous effects for the country's economic future. We speak to an International Bank of Commerce official who says America will need to import more workers to fill job shortages. When photographer Wes Naman invited friends to pose for a series of what was meant to be goofy portraits, neither he nor his models had any idea the images would end up reaching millions of people across the globe. More on why this Albuquerque artist's photos of distorted faces went viral.

Survey: Majority Of San Diego Latinos Feel Some Discrimination

San Diego celebrates its Hispanic roots through food, music and tourist attractions such as Old Town, the city’s original settlement — when it was still part of Mexico. But a recent survey commissioned by KPBS and San Diego Magazine finds that the people who gave us this cultural legacy face discrimination today. Jill Replogle from our Fronteras Desk has the story.
 
Declining Fertility May Spell Disaster for American Economy, Immigration Reform May Hold Solution

What to Expect When No One’s Expecting –America’s Coming Demographic Disaster,” is the title of a new book by Jonathan V. Last.

IBC’s Senior Vice President Eddie Aldrete  shares some of the author’s concerns, mostly about how people in America are having fewer babies. Aldrete says the stats show the country’s fertility rate is declining and that could have big implications for the country's economy in the future. He makes the case for why the U.S. needs to follow other countries in importing labor for the jobs seeing a shortage of workers.

Albuquerque Artist's Photos Of Distorted Faces Go Viral

The image of Rebekah Wiggins has proven to be the most popular in the Scotch Tape Series.
The image of Rebekah Wiggins has proven to be the most popular in the Scotch Tape Series.
Credit Wes Naman

When Albuquerque photographer Wes Naman invited friends to pose for a series of what was meant to be goofy portraits, neither he nor his models had any idea the images would end up reaching millions of people across the globe. From KUNM, Rita Daniels has the story of the artist's so called Scotch Tape Series.

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