Fronteras: Lessons Of The Holocaust; Muslim Refugees In Texas; & Artist Arturo Torres

Jul 6, 2018

This week on Fronteras:

  • San Antonio fifth-graders learn empathy and tolerance through lessons of the Holocaust (0:16).
  • Rohingya Muslims fleeing Myanmar find refuge in North Texas (12:03).
  • From childhood abuse to illustrator of two New York Times best-sellers: a profile of artist Arturo Torres (16:30).


Literature used in Lisa Barry's 5th grade class.
Credit Lisa Barry

Lessons Of The Holocaust ‘ Story That Was Supposed To Be Snuffed Out, A Face That Was Never To Be Seen’

Name calling. Teasing. Bullying. It may start with an elbow in the hallway, but it could lead to dire consequences.

FRONTERAS EXTRA | Teaching Tolerance Through Lessons From The Holocaust

Lisa Barry, a fifth grade English language arts and social studies teacher at Woodridge Elementary in San Antonio’s Alamo Heights Independent School District, uses the lessons of the Holocaust to spread the message of empathy. She was recently honored by the Jewish Federation of San Antonio as the first recipient of the Maxine Cohen Hope for Humanity Educator Award for her efforts to spread a message of love and support for humanity.

Barry joins us on Fronteras, along with Ellen Ollervidez, community relations council director and director of the Holocaust Memorial Museum of San Antonio.

 

Women participate in English class at the Islamic Circle of North America in Dallas.
Credit Pablo Arauz Peña / KERA

After Escaping Violence, Rohingya Refugees In North Texas Pursue Education, Find Community

There's an ongoing crisis in Myanmar caused by violence against Rohingya Muslims. Many call it genocide, which led to an exodus of hundreds of thousands of people. Pablo Peña reports that many Rohingya now call North Texas home.

 

Arturo Torres
Credit Hady Mawajdeh / KERA

Drawing Inspiration From Turmoil; Sketching A Brighter Future

What’s the best rap song of 1984? How about 2004? What would an NBA game look like if a grizzly bear were starting at power forward? These are the sorts of questions that Arturo Torres brings to life. KERA’s Hady Mawajdeh reports on how this Garland native transformed from aspiring artist to illustrator of two New York Times best-sellers.

Norma Martinez can be reached by email at norma@tpr.org and on Twitter @NormDog1