Fronteras Desk
10:50 am
Fri April 26, 2013

Immigration Reform Leaders Tackle Border Security

Fronteras: Before any immigration reform can happen, Homeland Security needs to prove the border is secure. Some border residents say that's just a numbers game. We also take a critical look at border drones and how proposed immigration reform is giving new hope for family reunions in Mexico. Also,the professional sports teams in Phoenix are trying to cultivate new fans across the border.

What It Means To Have A 90-Percent Secure Border

Before 11 million people living in this country illegally can start down the long path to citizenship, the U.S.-Mexico border must reach a level of security that satisfies border hawks in Congress - an argument that may not be won from statistics alone. From Tucson, Michel Marizco reports.

Senate Immigration Bill Calls For A Drone-Patrolled Border

The major immigration reform bill introduced last week by a bipartisan group of senators would earmark $6.5 billion to beef up border security. We take a closer look at the specific call for more drones to keep a watch on the southern border. As Jill Replogle from our Fronteras Desk reports, the border drones have yet to prove their worth.

For Families In Mexico, Immigration Reform Would Mean Reunions

Mexico sends the most immigrants to the U.S. and is arguably the foreign country that has the most at stake should comprehensive immigration reform pass Congress. For many Mexicans, the most anticipated part of reform is the chance to reunite with family members living in the U.S. without papers, who they haven’t seen for years, and in some cases, decades. From the Fronteras Desk, Jude Joffe-Block reports.

How Do Mexicans Feel About The Corona-Budweiser Merger?

The U.S. Justice Department has settled an anti-trust lawsuit against Anheuser-Busch Inc. Bev. That clears the way for the world's largest brewer to buy out Grupo Modelo, the Mexican company that makes Corona beer. Reporter Adrian Florido visited Tijuana to see how people feel about all this.

Phoenix Sports Teams Look to Mexico for Fans

Phoenix-based professional sports teams have long reached out to the metro area’s large Latino population to cultivate new fans, but now they are training their sites across the border. From the Fronteras Desk, Jude Joffe-Block reports it ties into a bigger strategy to bring Mexican tourists to Phoenix.

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