Fronteras Desk
2:01 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

More On Disney's 'Dia De Los Muertos' Debacle

Fronteras: Disney reacts to public outcry by withdrawing its effort to trademark ‘Dia De Los Muertos.’ Also on the show: It is widely reported that the nation has 11 million people living here without authorization, we take a closer look at that number. Young people in the Mormon Church are called to serve a 2-year mission, but what happens if you're sent on a mission, and you have no immigration papers? The changing face of Native American health programs under the federal healthcare overhaul. 

After Outcry, Disney Withdraws Effort To Trademark 'Dia De Los Muertos'

The Walt Disney Company attempt to trademark ‘Dia de los Muertos’ was a hot topic on social media this week. Disney has since said it will withdraw its trademark applications related to the Day of the Dead holiday.

Fronteras correspondent Mónica Ortiz Uribe reported Disney made the decision late Tuesday after an avalanche of backlash online. Uribe joins us on the program to talk about how she found out about Disney’s latest trademark attempt and the timeline of events thereafter.

11 Million Immigrants: What's In A Number?

Eleven million is the estimated number of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.  The number has become the most cited statistic in the immigration reform debate, but how did we even arrive at that figure?

Who are these 11 million? Is it even the best number to use? From the Fronteras Desk, Adrian Florido took a closer look.

Mormon Missionaries Without Papers

Since 2000, the number of Spanish-speaking Mormons in the U.S. has just about doubled. Many of those Latino Mormons don’t have legal documentation, which poses a problem for the church. Young Mormons are called to serve missions, which means spending two years on the road, trying to convert strangers to the faith.

So what happens when Mormons without papers come of legal age, and set off on their missions? Jack Rodolico of Latitudenews.com brings us one of their stories.

*This story comes with support from PRX and the Open Society Foundations

Indian Health Services Now Part Of Bigger Health Care Picture

Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act is expected to bring in much-needed dollars to the chronically-underfunded Indian Health Service (IHS). However, tribal health experts say the main game changer in Indian country will be new health insurance exchanges.  

For the first time ever, the IHS, a system traditionally open only to Native Americans, will be competing for non-Indian patients in order to survive.  From New Mexico, Tristan Ahtone reports.

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