District 9 Special Election
1:27 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

Pro-NDO Candidate Corey Clark Gives District 9 Something Different On May 10 Ballot

Block walking is an effective way to reach voters, according to Corey Clark. He's the 26-year-old small business owner who is running for San Antonio City Council District 9 in the May 10 joint, special and bond election.

"Morning, y'all," he said to residents off Bitters Tuesday. "I'm running for city office right now, District 9 city councilman."

Clark is currently finishing college, where he is majoring in political science. He said his interest in politics turned into a passion to help people. He found that out as an intern and worker in District 4 Councilman Rey Saldaña's office.

Out of respect for his colleague, interim District 9 Councilman Joe Krier, Saldaña preferred not to speak on the race, but he did say Clark has a heart for service.

Clark is a moderate Democrat, but sees current issues through the lens of the district. For example, he thinks the streetcar is a good idea, but he knows the majority of people in the district may not like it.

"I grew up in a generation where people are more open about whether they're lesbian, gay, bi, transgender... We want people to be who they are. I kind of want to represent that as a city council member."

"Personally, I wouldn't mind my taxpayer money going to it," he said. "But that's beyond the point here. I would have to vote on my district, what I sense the district wants, so I would vote 'no' against it, even though it's something I really, really wish I could see."

Clark said he grew up in a conservative household, but prides himself on taking each issue as they come.

One topic that differentiates him from other candidates, and conservative residents in the district, is the city's new non-discrimination ordinance. He agrees that the city needed it to protect everyone.

"I grew up in a generation where people are more open about whether they're lesbian, gay, bi, transgender or whatnot," he said. "I feel like my generation doesn't really have a care for that. We want people to be who they are. I kind of want to represent that as a city council member."

Those views clash with those of Elisa Chan, the former District 9 councilwoman who came under fire last year for her views on homosexuality. A secret recording of a staff meeting revealed she was trying to figure out how to oppose the topic publicly.

She eventually stepped down to run for Texas Senate; a run that was not successful.

Clark said he wants to represent everyone equally and hopes to pull off a win in the election. He faces Krier, Weston Martinez, Donald Oroian, and Bert Cecconi.