Fronteras Desk
12:37 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

The Stories Of Families Separated By Deportation

As Congress debates future guest worker programs, unresolved issues remain with both current and past guest workers. Also on the show: A multi-part series on deportation. We look at the children left behind when parents are deported and what happens to the kids deported by the United States.

Both Sides Find Things To Like, Hate About Immigration Bill

This week a bi-partisan group of senators released their proposed immigration reform bill -- a whopping 844 pages. Even so, the many groups with a stake in the bill started responding within hours of its release. Fronteras reporter Adrian Florido has a sampling.

Guest Worker Programs Have A Long History In U.S.

Fulfilling the demand for unskilled labor is a big part of the immigration bill unveiled by a group of bipartisan Senators this week. One of the oldest and certainly the largest guest worker program in U.S. history was that of the Braceros.

Nearly 5 million Mexican laborers worked in U.S. fields over the course of two decades. Mónica Ortiz Uribe reports that even as Congress debates future programs, unresolved issues remain with both current and past guest workers.

Children Left Behind: Deported Parents, American Kids

Today, we launch a multi-part series on deportation. Our first story focuses on the children left behind when a parent is deported.

According to an investigation by the Applied Research Center, a think-tank specializing in race issues, about 1500 children in Southern California were removed from detained or deported parents, and placed in state care in 2011.

They projected that between 2012 and 2014, 15,000 more kids could face a similar fate. For the Fronteras Desk, Erin Siegal McIntyre reports.

  • This report was produced and reported by Erin Siegal, Joel Medina, and Beth Caldwell, and was funded by a grant from the Soros Foundation.

A Revolving Door For Deported Children

Under the Obama administration, over 400,000 people were deported from the United States in 2012. The majority were adults - many with criminal records - but minors are sometimes caught up in this enforcement dragnet.

What happens to children and teens detained in the U.S. without papers, or deported without parents? For the Fronteras Desk, Erin Siegal McIntyre reports.

  • This report was produced and reported by Erin Siegal McIntyre, Joel Medina, and Beth Caldwell, supported by a grant from the Soros Foundation.

American Children In Mexico Face Educational Challenges

Nearly a quarter million parents of American citizen children were deported between 2010 and 2013. That means a new influx of American kids are now living—and learning—in Mexico. For the Fronteras Desk, Erin Siegal McIntyre reports on the tough educational choices faced by the American kids of deported parents in Tijuana.

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