Fronteras Desk
10:55 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Trade Delays At The Border Cost U.S. Billions

Fronteras: Homicides have spiked recently in Tijuana. Texas law enforcement officials say cartel activity is spreading to large cities. We look at how wait times at the border affect bi-national trade. Also on this show: The first of a two part series on the U.S.-born children of deported immigrants and the challenge to reunited them with their parents.

Street Dealers Fuel Spike In Violence In Tijuana

Tijuana newspapers have reported a recent spike in violent crime in the city. Between Monday and Tuesday of this week, local authorities registered seven homicides. Jill Replogle from our Fronteras Desk has more.

Texas Fighting Drug Cartel Activity Across The State

Texas state law enforcement is beefing up its efforts to fight Mexican drug cartels away from the border and in the state’s larger cities. Texas Public Radio’s David Martin Davies reports the cartels are using big cities such as Dallas-Fort Worth as hubs for cartel activity.

Immigration Bill Offers Few Changes to Border Patrol Use Of Force

The Senate is taking up the immigration bill this week amid demands from members of Congress to strengthen border security. There are also calls for a re-evaluation of the Border Patrol’s use of force. Investigations into these cases are hidden from public view and can drag on for years. From the Fronteras Desk, Michel Marizco reports.

Delays at the Border, Delays for Business

When it comes to the southern border, Congress wants to put up a stoplight. Stop the flow of drugs, stop illegal immigration and stop the terrorists. Last year the U.S. spent more on securing the border than it did on all federal law enforcement combined.

Some argue that needs to change. In a two-part series, Mónica Ortiz Uribe reports on how the lock down at the border chokes billions of dollars worth of legitimate traffic.

Delays in Border Trade Cost the U.S. Billions

At our southern border time is money. The U.S. and Mexico trade more than a billion dollars in goods every day. All that commerce comes through land crossings that spread from California to Texas. The problem is once that commercial traffic reaches the border it runs into long bottlenecks.

In part two of our series on delays at the border, Mónica Ortiz Uribe reports on the economic consequences and reaction in the U.S. Congress.

Deported Parents Face Hurdles to Reunite With U.S.-Citizen Children

Nearly one in four immigrants deported from the U.S. between 2010 and 2012 has a child who is a U.S. citizen — that's more than 200,000 people. About 5,000 children of deported parents end up in foster care.

These parents often face daunting barriers to reuniting with their children, but the Senate immigration reform bill might offer relief to some of these families. In the first of a two-part series on deported parents, Jill Replogle  from our Fronteras Desk reports.

* We will have part two on separated families at the border next week on Fronteras.

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