Fronteras Desk
1:27 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Voter Fraud, NAFTA 20 Years Later And Maria Berriozabal

A look at how widespread election fraud really is -  who is trying to stop voter fraud and how they’re doing it. The complex collaborations between manufacturers on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. Texas Public Radio’s David Martin Davies speaks with San Antonio trailblazer Maria Berriozabal about her new memoir, leadership and overcoming discrimination.

Voter Fraud a Hot-Button Issue, But Not a Widespread Problem

The United States has a long and checkered history when it comes to the ballot box. In the last several years, the issue of voter fraud has become a rallying cry in local, state, and national elections. But as Nick Blumberg reports in the first of two parts, questions remain on how widespread election fraud really is.

Vote Fraud Watchers Aim for 5,000 Observers at Arizona Polls

A Pennsylvania judge this month blocked that state’s voter ID law, and recently the national Republican Party fired an Arizona company that organized get-out-the-vote drives in swing states over suspicious registration forms. In the second of two parts, Nick Blumberg reports on who’s trying to stop voter fraud and how they’re doing it.

Arizona Manufacturer Sees Mexico as Key to Growth

These days about six million American jobs actually depend in some way on trade with Mexico according to the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute.  In part six of the Fronteras Desk series: NAFTA 20 Years Later, Jude Joffe-Block reports on the complex collaborations between manufacturers on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Berriozabal on Leadership and Overcoming Discrimination

Maria Berriozabal is a transitional individual for San Antonio.  She was the first Latina elected to city council, serving from 1981 to 91, and she was nearly elected mayor of San Antonio in 1991. No longer in public office, Berriozabal can also be called a controversial figure. She's a news maker and role model for future generations of Latinas looking to shape public policy and take a stand in the public square for social justice. 

In her memoir, “Maria, Daughter of Immigrants,” Berriozabal explains how a studious and quiet girl from San Antonio’s West Side grew up to take on the city’s power brokers. She speaks to Texas Public Radio's David Martin Davies. 


 

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