Why Aren't Nicaraguan Children Fleeing To The U.S.?

Aug 1, 2014

Fronteras: Notably absent from the unprecedented exodus from Central America are children from the region’s poorest country: Nicaragua. The story of one boy, who traveled from Honduras to North Texas. ICE is going to start housing women with children at a Karnes County detention center that used to house men. Fronteras takes a tour of the facility that has been renovated to accommodate families. Also, tiny windmills, smaller than an ant? Researchers are working on it and it could one day power your cell phone.

Judge Says Immigrant Kids Won't Be Heading To Dallas County

Nearly five weeks after Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said North Texas would host 2,000 unaccompanied immigrant children, he announced a change of plans. As KERA’s Doualy Xaykaothao reports, Jenkins said the migrants will stay at federal facilities because the number of kids crossing into the U.S. has dropped.

Karnes County Facility To House Immigrant Women and Kids

In the past, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has faced harsh criticism for conditions at its immigration detention facilities. Now it has unveiled a new kind of center in Karnes County. Officials are calling the center “residential” rather than "detention."

While the facility is expected to accept detainees over the next few weeks, ICE opened the doors to the press to see the facility first hand. TPR’s Joey Palacios takes us inside.

From Honduras To North Texas: One Boy Shares His Story

Like many children who have crossed the border, Brayan Arce is not sure if he’ll be able to permanently stay in the U.S. What he is certain about is that living in Honduras has become too dangerous, especially for kids. KERA’s Stella Chavez sat down with Brayan and his mom at their Dallas home. They talked about life back home and the decision to come here.

Why Nicaraguan Kids Aren’t Fleeing To U.S.

Since last October, the U.S. Border Patrol has apprehended more than 57,000 children traveling alone from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. Notably absent from this unprecedented exodus from Central America are children from the region’s poorest country: Nicaragua. Fronteras reporter Jill Replogle wanted to know why.

Honey, I Shrunk The Windmills! To the Size of an Ant

Last week we heard about solar power in Texas. Now we turn to wind.

Commercial wind turbines stand more than a hundred feet tall, with blades nearly as long. The wind turbines developed by engineers at the University of Texas at Arlington are a bit smaller. As part of KERA’s Breakthroughs series, Lauren Silverman reports on micro windmills, which are tinier than an ant.