All Things Considered on KSTX

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

All Things Considered has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting.

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Europe
3:02 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

German Chancellor Proposes A Europe-Only Network

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

When German Chancellor Angela Merkel meets with French President Francois Hollande tomorrow, here's one thing that will be on the table: a Europe-only communications network.

CHANCELLOR ANGELA MERKEL: (Foreign language spoken)

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Law
3:02 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Florida's 'Santa Claus' Of Speeding Tickets Gets Clipped

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Motorists in north Florida know the town of Hampton as a speed trap, or at least the two-block stretch of Highway 301 that passes through Hampton. And now, state lawmakers are planning to get rid of it - not the stretch of highway, they plan to get rid of the town. To explain this, reporter Aaron Deslatte joins us from Orlando. He's the capital bureau chief for the Orlando Sentinel. Welcome to the program.

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Law
3:02 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Once Neglected, Secretaries Of State Step Into The Spotlight

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 6:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Control of Congress won't be the only big question in this fall's elections. A quieter but critical battle is being waged over state-level races for secretary of state. In most states, that's the official in charge of running elections. Elections have become a political lightning rod. Many conservatives rail against voter fraud and lax rules, liberals say that's voter suppression. And now, as NPR's Peter Overby reports, superPACs want to nationalize the fight over secretary of state.

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National Security
3:13 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

The Art And Practice Of Protecting American Technology

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 6:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

To talk about the ongoing high tech Whack-A-Mole game between the U.S. and China, we're joined by James Lewis. He's with the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.

And, James Lewis, we've heard about parts for missile guidance systems, but what other kinds of technologies are vulnerable to China's commercial cyber espionage?

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Technology
3:13 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Cold War Technology Sought By Spy Is In Your Pocket — Sort Of

Originally published on Mon February 17, 2014 6:59 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

And now to All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

CORNISH: Today is a tricky business of keeping some American technologies out of foreign hands. When a man from Hong Kong met with an aerospace company in Seattle last week, he was really dealing with an undercover Homeland Security agent. See Kee Chin allegedly tried to buy $85,000 worth of highly specialized accelerometers. He was arrested and charged with trying to smuggle the parts to China.

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Music Reviews
3:13 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Album Review: 'Always With Us,' By Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 10:05 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, BYLINE: The South African all-male group Ladysmith Black Mambazo became world-famous after collaborating with Paul Simon on the Grammy-winning 1986 album "Graceland." Since their beginning in the '60s, the group has recorded more than 50 albums and won multiple awards. Their new release is a remembrance for one of their own, the late wife of the group's bandleader. It's called "Always With Us." Banning Eyre has this review.

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Singing in foreign language)

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Sports
4:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

New York Skier Can't Seem To Win Anywhere But Olympics

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 6:12 pm

U.S. alpine skier Andrew Weibrecht's finish in the men's super-G earned him a silver medal on Sunday. It was a remarkable follow-up to the bronze medal he won four years ago in Vancouver.

Around the Nation
4:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

West Virginians Still Stocking Up On Water, Fearing Pollution

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 6:12 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

There are some basic things we take for granted, at least in the developed world, that the air we breathe or the water that flows into our homes won't make us sick. So imagine you turn on your local TV news to this.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS REPORT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: State of emergency in several counties tonight after a chemical spills into the water supply. Good evening. I'm...

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Around the Nation
4:18 pm
Sun February 16, 2014

Long-Running Gang-Intervention Program Squeezed By Budget

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 6:12 pm

Father Greg Boyle, the founder of Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles, talks with NPR's Arun Rath about his organization's mission and financial struggles. The nonprofit, which is going into its 26th year, is the largest gang-intervention program in the country.

Around the Nation
7:30 pm
Sat February 15, 2014

Partial Verdict Reached In Fla. Gas Station Shooting

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 8:27 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

In Jacksonville, a trial that has once again thrown a spotlight on the state's Stand Your Ground law has ended with a mistrial on the main charge of murder. Michael Dunn, a 47-year-old software designer, was charged with murder and four other counts after shooting and killing 17-year-old Jordan Davis in a dispute over loud music.

NPR's Greg Allen has been following the case and joins us now. Greg, mistrial on murder, but what about the other charges?

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