All Things Considered on KSTX

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

All Things Considered has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting.

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Politics
4:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Despite Drama, Oregon GOP Choice Comes Down To Purity, Practicality

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:16 pm

Two Republicans with compelling personal stories are vying for the chance to unseat Oregon's incumbent Democratic senator, Jeff Merkley. Monica Wehby is a doctor with a rare specialty: She performs brain surgery on kids. Her chief opponent, Jason Conger, rose from extreme poverty to attend Harvard Law School in just a few years. The Northwest News Network's Chris Lehman reports on the GOP primary as it unfolds.

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Movie Interviews
4:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Filmmaker Brings Light To Roma, Holocaust Victims Lost To History

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:16 pm

The Roma people — commonly called Gypsies — have long been relegated to the margins of European society. As outsiders, they were targeted during the Holocaust, but the number of victims remains little-known. Filmmaker Aaron Yeger tells their story in the documentary A People Uncounted, and he joins the program to explain more.

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Music
4:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Heir To A Jazz Legacy, A Trumpeter Finds His Own Way

Theo Croker's new album, AfroPhysicist, comes out May 20.
Thomas Brodin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:20 am

Jazz composer and trumpeter Theo Croker opens his new album, AfroPhysicist, with an ode to his grandfather: New Orleans jazz great Doc Cheatham. The thing is, Croker didn't grow up in New Orleans or any other jazz hub. He's from Jacksonville, Fla., and he was just a child when his grandfather died in 1997. It wasn't until his grandfather's memorial services — attended by jazz legends — that he decided to join the legacy.

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Science
3:42 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Big Bang's Ripples: Two Scientists Recall Their Big Discovery

The Holmdel Horn Antenna at Bell Telephone Laboratories in New Jersey was built in 1959 to make the first phone call via satellite.
NASA

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:27 pm

On May 20, 1964, two astronomers working at a New Jersey laboratory turned a giant microwave antenna toward what they thought would be a quiet part of the Milky Way. They weren't searching for anything; they were trying to make adjustments to their instrument before looking at more interesting things in the sky.

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Europe
3:37 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

UK Government Asks: What's The Greatest Challenge Of Our Time?

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:20 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, a prize that's making a return: the Longitude Prize.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It was set up in 1714 by the British government to solve the greatest challenge of that time: Pinpoint a ship's location at sea by knowing its longitude.

CORNISH: Three hundred years later, there's a video announcing its return.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: We're at the dawn of a new world.

SIEGEL: Its committee is led by Lord Martin Rees, a professor at Cambridge University.

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NPR Ed
3:37 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Anatomy Of A Great Commencement Speech

Comedian and actress Amy Poehler addresses Harvard University's graduating class of 2011 on the school's campus, in Cambridge, Mass.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 9:20 am

It's that time again — graduation season. And that means next week or last week or right this very minute, some 7 million students in the U.S. and lots of doting parents have to sit through a commencement speech.

If you're stuck listening to a particularly bad one — or just need an inspiration infusion — the NPR Ed Team has sifted through hundreds of past speeches (going all the way back to 1774) and built an online database of the very best.

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Remembrances
4:10 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

For A Showman Larger Than Life, An Even Bigger Best Friend

When your best friend weighs several tons, sometimes a trunk hug will have to do.
Scott Raffe Courtesy of Shotwell Media

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:41 pm

Ivor David Balding once said, "I wanted an elephant all my life." And he got her: Balding adopted a baby elephant named Flora. Together, he and his beloved elephant were the stars of Circus Flora, which he co-founded in St. Louis. Decades later, the circus remains an institution in the city.

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Law
4:07 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Fiery British Imam Found Guilty Of Terrorism Charges

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:54 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

In New York, a jury has found a British imam guilty on 11 counts of terrorism. Abu Hamza al-Masri was a fiery speaker at a London mosque and he's seen as an inspiration to people who later became familiar names in terror cases. People like attempted shoe bomber Richard Reid, who visited that mosque. Now, after a relatively quick trial, he's been found guilty, like several of his followers before him.

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Politics
4:07 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Tea Party Stumbles As GOP Establishment Flexes Fundraising Strength

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:54 pm

Tea Party candidates did well in GOP primary elections in 2010 and 2012; this year, not so much. Part of this lack of success is because establishment candidates have generally out-raised them, and establishment-aligned outside groups are no longer reluctant to get involved in primaries.

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Technology
3:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

The Rise Of Blogger-Activists, And The Regimes That Rule By Fear

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:54 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Emily Parker has written about how the Internet is changing activism. Her new book is called "Now I Know Who My Comrades Are: Voices from the Underground."

Emily Parker, thanks for coming in to our New York bureau.

EMILY PARKER: Thank you so much for having me.

CORNISH: So your research comes in part from interviews with bloggers and online activists in countries like Russia. Give us a sense, what are some of the advantages that they have today compared to a generation or two ago?

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