All Things Considered on KSTX

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

All Things Considered has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting.

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Parallels
3:46 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

God Save The Queen — And Donetsk, Too?

The online "God Save The Queen" campaign that started as a joke called for Donetsk to hold a referendum on whether to join Great Britain. Eventually, it was shut down: for being anti-Russian.
Novosti Donbassa

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 2:16 am

The eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk has been the center of a standoff since Sunday, with demonstrators pleading for the city to join Russia, while government leaders insist it will remain part of Ukraine.

In the midst of this tug-of-war, there's a third country that may have a claim on the city — though admittedly, a much looser one.

"God Save The Queen" isn't just the British national anthem, it's also the name of a campaign to bring Donetsk under the sheltering wing of Her Majesty's United Kingdom.

(You read that correctly: the UK. Stay with us here.)

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Found Recipes
3:46 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Americans, Just Get Over It And Make The Souffle

Even one fluffy forkful of souffle is a worthy reward for making the effort.
Kelly Gorham Courtesy of Kelly Gorham Photography

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 11:41 am

The souffle shares this in common with some of nature's most vicious predators: It can sense fear. This, at least, according to noted American chef James Beard, who once observed, "The only thing that will make a souffle fall is if it knows you're afraid of it."

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Code Switch
3:46 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

How The Son Of A Confederate Soldier Became A Civil Rights Hero

Sculptor Richard Weaver created this life-sized sculpture of federal judge J. Waties Waring.
Rick Rhodes Courtesy of the J Waties Waring Statue Committee

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:12 pm

U.S. District Judge J. Waties Waring was the son of a Confederate soldier but later became a hero of the civil rights movement — though he was vilified for his views. On Friday — more than 60 years after Waring was one of the first in the Deep South to declare that forced segregation was unconstitutional — Charleston, S.C., will honor him with a life-sized statue.

Waring was first appointed to the bench in 1942. Nine years later, in a landmark school segregation case Briggs v. Elliott, Waring denounced segregation as an "evil that must be eradicated."

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Environment
5:36 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Why Do Some Clouds Drop Rain, While Others Don't?

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Recent storms in California haven't been enough to save the state from a serious drought. And now, the rainy season is winding down. Scientists are trying to understand why some storms unload lots of rain and snow in California and others don't. As Lauren Sommer reports from member station KQED in San Francisco, there could be a link to dust storms thousands of miles away.

LAUREN SOMMER, BYLINE: The sky over the Pacific Ocean is looking pretty ominous - big dark gray clouds in the distance.

I think it feels like rain.

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All Tech Considered
4:37 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

What To Do Now That The Heartbleed Bug Exposed The Internet

The Heartbleed bug has exposed up to two-thirds of the Internet to a security vulnerability.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 10:27 am

With a name like Heartbleed, it's no surprise it's bad. A vulnerability in OpenSSL — the Internet's most commonly used cryptographic library — has been bleeding out information, 64 kilobytes at a time, since March 2012.

"I would classify it as possibly the top bug that has hit the Internet that I've encountered, because of it being so widespread, because it's so hard to detect," says Andy Grant, a security analyst at iSEC Partners.

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Planet Money
4:27 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Across The Atlantic, Glimpse An Alternate Internet Universe

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:53 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Already for many Americans, there are few options when it comes to high-speed broadband. And the reason, says Zoe Chace with our Planet Money team, goes back to a moment when the U.S. decided to go one way and the rest of the world went another.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: That moment, March 14th, 2002, a bunch of people from the Federal Communications Commission pondering an existential question. There's this brand-new cable coming into your home with the Internet on it. What is this thing?

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Around the Nation
4:27 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Out Of The Rubble Of Tragedy, How To Build A New Sandy Hook?

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:48 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Newtown, Connecticut, is moving forward with plans to rebuild Sandy Hook Elementary School. The original building where gunman Adam Lanza shot and killed 20 children and six adults was demolished late last year. The process of designing a new school, one that both honors the wishes of the community and provides a new home for learning, lies with architect Barry Svigals. Svigals and his design team recently unveiled their plans at a town meeting in Newtown, and he joins us now to talk more about it. Welcome to the program.

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Environment
3:45 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Federal Plan To Save Prairie Chickens Ruffles State Feathers

A male lesser prairie chicken in the Texas Panhandle. The bird's entire habitat includes parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.
Jon McRoberts AP

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 4:29 pm

It's prairie chicken mating season!

Still, it's tough being a lesser prairie chicken these days. This type of grouse once spanned an enormous area, though now they survive mainly in pockets of Oklahoma and Kansas. Their numbers are plummeting; in 2012, the population dropped by half.

But after they were recently listed as a threatened species by the U.S. government, complaints of federal overreach and lawsuits have followed.

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Food
3:45 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Arab Israeli Celebrity Chef Aims To Foster Peace Through Cooking

Microbiologist Nof Atamna-Ismaeel took the top prize in the fourth season of Israeli reality cooking show Master Chef.
Courtesy of Channel 2

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 11:25 am

Reality cooking shows have propelled many an aspiring chef to foodie stardom in the U.S. — Harold Dieterle, Jeff Mauro and Mike Isabella, to name a few.

But unlike her American counterparts, the most recent winner of Israel's Master Chef does not aspire to launch her own show or even open her own restaurant.

At first blush, the Arab Israeli cook Nof Atamna-Ismaeel has smaller ambitions: opening a Jewish-Arab cooking school. But her ultimate goal — to create common ground between Arab and Jewish Israelis — is anything but modest.

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Parallels
3:37 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Ukrainian Protesters Seize Weapons, Raising The Stakes

A pro-Russian activist speaks at the Security Services building, which was seized in Luhansk, eastern Ukraine. The standoff is one of three taking place in the region, and Luhansk is considered particularly volatile because the Security Services building contains many weapons.
Igor Golovniov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:48 pm

The drive to Luhansk takes you past fields of corn and sunflowers that are just beginning to sprout. You pass the town of Yennakieva, where the ousted Ukrainian president, Viktor Yanukovych, was born. Eventually the fields give way to factories, and about 15 miles from the border with Russia, you hit the industrial city of Luhansk.

Police have blocked off the center of town. The last few blocks to the heart of the protest, at the occupied security services building, is a journey by foot, past graffiti that say, "Luhansk is a Russian City."

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