The American Homefront Project

The American Homefront Project features reporting on military life and veterans issues.

We're visiting bases to chronicle how troops are working and living. We're meeting military families. We're talking with veterans to learn about the challenges they face. We cover major policy issues at the Pentagon and Department of Veterans Affairs, and we report on family issues service members and veterans experience in their daily lives. From the youngest military recruits to the veterans of World War II, we're reporting in-depth stories about Americans who serve.

Funding for The American Homefront Project comes from:

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The VA hopes to roll out a national "whole health" program for veterans, offering them acupuncture, tai chi, yoga,and other alternative mental health therapies.

The Veterans Health Administration is planning to make mental health care more available to help reduce veteran suicide. But veterans advocates worry about the impact on the already strained VA health system.

The Trump Administration wants to grow the Army substantially, even as potential recruits get harder to find. That's putting more pressure on recruiters than they've seen in years.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

The average military family moves every two to three years. Their household goods are supposed to follow them, but it doesn’t always pan out that way. Some military families report that their possessions were lost, damaged, or stolen during moves — and they say the military doesn't do much to help.

 


About 1.7 million troops are eligible to switch from a traditional pension plan to a blended plan that works more like a 401(k). But some lack the financial skills to evaluate their options.

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