The American Homefront Project

The American Homefront Project features reporting on military life and veterans issues.

We're visiting bases to chronicle how troops are working and living. We're meeting military families. We're talking with veterans to learn about the challenges they face. We cover major policy issues at the Pentagon and Department of Veterans Affairs, and we report on family issues service members and veterans experience in their daily lives. From the youngest military recruits to the veterans of World War II, we're reporting in-depth stories about Americans who serve.

Funding for The American Homefront Project comes from:

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California has become the eighth state to legalize recreational marijuana.  But using the drug can still end a military career.

"The Secret Ops of the CIA" calendars spotlight an unusual art genre: meticulous paintings of spy missions.

Homelessness often looks different for veterans living in rural communities: Rather than living in the streets, they may be couch-surfacing, sleeping in their cars, or camping in the woods.

Carson Frame / The American Homefront Project

Less than half of one percent of Americans are currently on active duty in the military, compared with about 2 percent during the Vietnam era and about 9 percent during World War II.  

That may be contributing to civilians' lack of understanding about military life, with veterans increasingly choosing to associate with one another for friendship and support.


A workshop in New York uses creative writing and Shakespearean monologues to help veterans heal.

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