Fronteras

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a collaborative regional news project that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Central Texas to Southern California, and from Las Vegas to the Mexican border, Fronteras brings emphasis to Latino and Native American life and border issues affecting American politics, social order, economics and the environmental landscape.

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Fronteras
9:27 am
Mon May 12, 2014

In Tijuana, These Sisters Rule The Boxing Ring

Kristin Wall www.kristinwalldesigns.com via Flickr

Fronteras: More high schools in Texas may start offering Mexican-American studies. Can you guess the political affiliation of a legislator just by looking at them? In Texas, it’s pretty simple. Experts say a new bi-national agreement just signed in San Antonio has the potential to solve a variety of issues. Boxing competes only with soccer as Tijuana’s most popular sport: We’ll hear about two sisters who are slugging their way into the spotlight.

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Fronteras
3:12 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Amid College Week, Experts Say Higher Educational Attainment Still Low In Bexar County

First Lady Michelle Obama speaking at The University of Texas at San Antonio Friday for College Week.
Joey Palacios TPR News

Fronteras: About two months ago the world’s most wanted drug trafficker, Sinaloa Cartel leader "El Chapo" Guzmán, was captured in a joint operation and Mexico won’t even consider sending Guzmán to face charges in the U.S. It's been about a year since a formal border crossing linking Big Bend National Park and the tiny Mexican village of Boquillas del Carmen was re-opened. The economy there had been suffering but now that tourist dollars have started flowing south again hopes are high in the tourist town. Also, this is College Week in San Antonio.

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Fronteras
12:00 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

New Book Sounds Alarm On Growing "Border Patrol Nation"

Fronteras: The number of U.S. Border Patrol agents has been growing rapidly — and not just along the southern border with Mexico. We speak to Todd Miller author of the new book, “Border Patrol Nation,” about the agency's expanding reach and the implications for privacy rights, civil liberties and more. On a lighter note, taking pictures in a field of Bluebonnets is a favorite springtime tradition in Texas. But we take you to one town that is especially serious about its bluebonnets.

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Fronteras
12:00 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Colorado River Adventures Turn Deadly For Kayakers Without Guides

A group of paddlers prepare for their first rapid.
Laurel Morales Fronteras

Fronteras: Legislation to compensate "downwinders" -- people suffering from cancer caused by the fallout of atomic testing near Las Vegas in the 50s -- left out some affected areas and now people are demanding federal compensation. In Phoenix, there's a unique tradition of bringing together both Jews and Latinos to celebrate Passover that brings together two ethnic communities. The last 10 fatalities on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon have been on self-guided trips.

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Fronteras
2:52 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Mennonite Suspect Allegedly Duped Mexicans Into Smuggling Drugs

A Mennonite father and son at work in a field near Casas Grandes, Chihuahua.
Credit Lorne Matalon

Fronteras: Federal prosecutors in Texas and New Mexico are dealing with an unusual case involving a man from a Mennonite community in Mexico. We take you into the fields of New Mexico where workers are cleaning out an ancient irrigation system. These hand-dug ditches may help retain precious river water in times of drought. Further south, drought is forcing a Mexican city to ration water -- and it's only spring.

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Fronteras
1:40 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

The Feast of San Sebastian: A Dark Tale Of Human Trafficking In Puerto Rico

La Perla community in Puerto Rico.
Jonathan Marcantoni

Fronteras: One of the fastest growing cities in the Southwest is squeezing out pronghorn antelope. For the first time in almost 20 years, the Colorado River is flowing into northern Mexico through a dam that usually stops it. Some estimates show that the Obama administration has hit two million deportations, which is prompting protests across the country. Also, we speak to San Antonio Author Jonathan Marcantoni about his book, "The Feast of San Sebastian," human trafficking in Puerto Rico and his Puerto Rican identity.

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Fronteras
2:14 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Steve Inskeep On Reporting From The "Borderland"

Texas rancher Dob Cunningham, right, stands on the edge of his 800-acre ranch in Quemado, Texas, which touches the Rio Grande. On the other side, Mexico.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Fronteras: A conversation with "Morning Edition" host Steve Inskeep, who joins us to talk about NPR’s Borderland series: stories about the people, goods and culture that cross back and forth across the U.S.-Mexico border. Mónica Ortiz Uribe introduces us to the Barrio Aztecas of El Paso, one of the more frightening gangs that operate on the border. Lent is a time of spiritual reflection, but it also means a change in diet for those who take part. Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides tells us about how the foods of lent can be sinfully good.

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Fronteras
1:43 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Energy Boom, Light Pollution Threaten Astronomy In West Texas

A glow over the northern horizon at McDonald Observatory near Ft. Davis,Texas. The light is generated by round-the-clock oil and gas operations in the Permian Basin.
Bill Wren

Fronteras: The energy boom in Texas and New Mexico is inadvertently compromising the jet-black night skies that astronomers need to do their research. After several decades in the doldrums, the Mexican film industry is seeing some light on the horizon. There’s been a rise of federal immigration crimes -- we speak to an expert from Pew Research about what’s driving that growth. Farmers and ranchers from across the nation are calling for action on immigration reform and the Texas Farm Bureau is asking Congress to “get ‘er done” to help farmers compete.

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Fronteras
2:52 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Fearing Rape, Migrant Women Prepare For Crossing With Birth Control

A poster hanging in a migrant shelter in Nogales, Mexico. The text reads "I have the right to be respected physically, sexually and psychologically," in Spanish.
Jude Joffe-Block

On Fronteras: Women migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border face many dangers on the journey, including rape. The crimes usually go unpunished. But there’s one case now in an Arizona court that is different.

...also, the U.S. Border Patrol says it’s refining its techniques when facing people who throw rocks at agents along the border.

...and Burmese refugees living in the Southwest are working hard to learn English - even though some are illiterate. They’re future depends on learning the language.

Finally, as spring rolls around, hear a commentary about the promise of the season, which can be both bountiful and bleak.

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Fronteras
11:06 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Despite Water Crisis, Some Arizona Farmers Are Exporting Crops

Some of Yuma County's alfalfa will go to feedlots and dairies in the region. Others will be shipped overseas to China, where the demand for hay has grown.
Laurel Morales Fronteras

Fronteras: As California struggles with its water crisis and the rest of the southwest deals with drought, some criticize Arizona farmers for exporting some of their crops overseas. In the final part of our series "Pipe Dreams" we look at the controversy of indirectly exporting water overseas. A new lawsuit in Arizona federal court is trying to block new state abortion restrictions from taking effect on April 1. What's at stake in that state's latest legal fight over abortion? Also, crowded college classrooms have some U.S. students heading south of the border for their higher education.

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