Fronteras

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a collaborative regional news project that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Central Texas to Southern California, and from Las Vegas to the Mexican border, Fronteras brings emphasis to Latino and Native American life and border issues affecting American politics, social order, economics and the environmental landscape.

Texas Tribune

— Last summer tens of thousands of unaccompanied Central American minors crossed the Rio Grande and entered the United States.  Many were fleeing violence in their countries.  Ambassador Thomas Shannon tells Fronteras the U.S. government is hoping a plan being implemented will prevent another wave of child migrants.  

—After living illegally for years in the United States many residents of  Tijuana, Mexico,  are being deported to Mexico.   Read on for why they're waiting in Tijuana.

This Week On Fronteras:

-- The families and classmates of 43 missing Mexican college students traveled across the U.S. to raise awareness for their situation.

-- A movement is underway to prevent suicides by freeing immigrant mothers and their children from detention centers.

-- From New Mexico, here’s some stereotype defying information about gun violence.

-- The best bilingual teacher in the U.S. hails from Dallas.

-- A talk with the directors of the new border documentary, Western.

Bob Daemmrich / Texas Tribune

This week on Fronteras:

-- Texas lawmakers are fast-tracking laws that would allow licensed residents to carry guns more openly and on college campuses.

-- National attention on the police shooting deaths of young black and brown men prompts student lessons on how to be safe.

-- An Iraqi immigrant is shot and killed in Dallas. The killing raises disturbing questions.

-- The history of frontier guns and why people feel a connection with firearms.

KUNM Public Radio

This Week on Fronteras:

·       Mexican police score a big arrest in the bloody drug war along the border

·       A Texas county refuses to take federal drug cases coming from border patrol checkpoints.

·       In one New Mexico community water from the Rio Grande has long been important for sustaining crops and religious ceremonies. Now residents say it’s polluted.

·       Crossing the U.S.-Mexico border turned out tragically for one young man who has been in a coma for 15 years.

Mose Buchele / NPR StateImpact

  On Fronteras:

-- Energy companies navigate fluctuating crude oil prices.  Who will survive?

-- Where is all the stolen oil-field equipment headed?

-- Trucking oil and gas is leading to treacherous travel on Texas roads.

-- The building of energy pipelines creates jobs, but how will that affect the environment in Texas and New Mexico? 

-- A new monument honors a Mexican who signed the Texas Declaration of Independence and fought for Tejano rights

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