Fronteras

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a collaborative regional news project that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Central Texas to Southern California, and from Las Vegas to the Mexican border, Fronteras brings emphasis to Latino and Native American life and border issues affecting American politics, social order, economics and the environmental landscape.

 

   On Fronteras:

·        Jade Helm military exercises began in seven states, with government skeptics concerned about the intent of the training.  At training sites near Bastrop, Texas, residents there are divided over whether the troops are involved in activities that threaten civil liberties. 

·        A spokesperson for the Special Operations Command says the military is working hard to counter fears that Jade Helm troops are planning to detain citizens or implement some kind of martial law.

John Burnett / NPR

This week on Fronteras:

•          A federal task force has moved into the Rio Grande Valley to investigate long-standing political corruption. 

•          NPR’s John Burnett talks to Texas Public Radio about the origins of the federal corruption probe, including concerns that businesses will not bring economic development to the region as long as the corruption is so widespread.

•          Teens living on both sides of the border near San Diego are tackling issues affected young Hispanics, including high school dropout rates and unemployment.

Flickr user Fibonacci Blue / cc

On Fronteras this week:

·        Same-sex marriage is the law of the land but in Texas some county officials are resisting

·        A civil rights expert and legal scholar says efforts to slow implementation of Supreme Court rulings is nothing new.  He puts the same-sex marriage ruling into historical context.

·        Congressional Democrats are raising questions about detention centers holding women and children.

·        Tijuana residents are asking the government to save an old river habitat threatened by development.

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas is the number one U.S. destination for refugees.  The decision to leave home for the journey is a tough choice.

--In the wake of police confrontations, more Texas police departments are buying body cameras for their officers.  

--A Texas company is a go-to source in the growing market for police body cameras.

--Mexicans who have been departed say it’s hard to earn the parole they need to fight their cases in the United States.

--Women make up only 25 percent of workers in the male dominated oil business. 

Wikimedia

  This week on Fronteras:

--Texas spends millions on border security but wants the Obama administration to pay for it.

--Texas farmers survived the drought.  Now they’re working to survive recent flooding.

--Water problems also are plaguing New Mexico where runoff from the storms is polluting the Rio Grande.

--A Fort Worth organization is helping young people recover from the financial consequences of gang life.

--An Austin mother in public housing is struggling to keep her son in one school. 

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