Fronteras

Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

"Fronteras" is a Texas Public Radio program exploring the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, "Fronteras" provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics and the environment.

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St. Mary's University

Erica Schommer is an immigration lawyer and clinical assistant professor at St. Mary’s School of Law. She has practiced law with Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, and has worked on various human rights issues in Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica.

Schommer says immigrants who are victims of crime often have a better chance of achieving legal status in the U.S. The Violence Against Women Act, for example, allows abused women to petition for legalization.  


Mallory Falk

A Colombian undocumented immigrant, living in the U.S. for 20 years has spent the last 10 months living with a Franciscan community in New Mexico.  On this episode of Fronteras, we look at the difficulty of living under the persistent threat of deportation (0:00).

Then we explore immigration laws in the U.S. and how it evolves from administration to administration — from the detention of families to the denial of bail to certain detainees (12:33).


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

 

Everett Fly is an award-winning San Antonio architect and landscape architect. He is a 2014 National Humanities Medalist, honored by the White House for preserving the integrity of African-American places and landmarks.  

Fly has played an important role in unveiling the hidden African-American history of San Antonio. The east side of the city is known for being predominantly African-American, while the west side is predominantly Hispanic.


www.everettfly.com

The story of San Antonio is entwined with that of the Spaniards, Mexicans, Native Americans, and Anglo settlers. But the African-American story of the Alamo City is not one that’s widely known.


Eddie Torres

This week on Fronteras:

  • Black women are dying either before or after childbirth in higher numbers than the rest of the Texas population.
  • The small South Texas city of Pharr is connecting homes with free broadband internet in an effort to close the digital divide (8:33).
  • Local composer Federico Chavez-Blanco has been commissioned to write music for San Antonio’s Tricentennial celebration (14:15).


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