Fronteras

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a collaborative regional news project that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Central Texas to Southern California, and from Las Vegas to the Mexican border, Fronteras brings emphasis to Latino and Native American life and border issues affecting American politics, social order, economics and the environmental landscape.

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Fronteras Desk
1:46 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Concern Rising In Truth Or Consequences, N.M., About Abundance Of Healing Hot Springs

Downtown Truth or Consequences is dotted with locally owned hotels that feature in-house bathhouses for hot mineral water soaks.
Monica Ortiz Uribe Fronteras

Fronteras: Tourists love the hot springs baths in the town of Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. But just how plentiful are these waters? Medical debt affects one in four families in America and many will continue to experience financial burdens, despite increased access to health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. We look at access to healthcare and medical debt in the second of a two part series. On this Valentine’s Day, Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides talks about her love of being bilingual.

 

 

  

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Fronteras Desk
2:40 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

People In ACA 'Affordability Gap' Risk Future In Medical Debt

Percentage of persons under age 65 in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months, by poverty status and 6-month interval: United States, January 2011–June 2012.
CDC/NCHS

Fronteras: The Affordable Care Act aims to increase access to healthcare, but for those in the so-called "affordability gap" insurance may still be out of reach. We speak to Politico about a program just launched to provide scholarships for undocumented student immigrants. Also, it was 150 years ago that Mexico was invaded by the French and ruled by Maximilian. It was a time of betrayals, brutality and war, but who was Maximilian?

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Fronteras Desk
1:55 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Costly Reforms To Prevent Racial Profiling By Joe Arpaio's Office

Opponents of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio briefly gathered in the lobby of the sheriff's office in early January in protest of his record.
Jude Joffe-Block Fronteras

Fronteras: Long-awaited rail connection linking large Mexican ports in Sinaloa and Michoacan to Texas will break ground in 2015. Arizona’s Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office is under a court order to prevent racial profiling. By some measures, Mexico might have some of the fastest Internet speeds in Latin America, but for Tijuana's ambitious tech entrepreneurs and aspiring professional gamers, it's still painfully slow.

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Fronteras Desk
2:00 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Same-Sex Couples Challenging Arizona Marriage Laws

Terry Pochert and Joe Connolly are plaintiffs in a January suit that take on the state's definition of marriage.
Jude Joffe-Block Fronteras

Fronteras: It's been 150 years since the U.S. Army forced the Navajo and Mescalero Apache to walk 400 miles to a prison camp in eastern New Mexico in an attempt to wipe out their culture. "The Long Walk's"  impacts are still felt today. Supporters of same-sex marriage have seen recent victories in the past few weeks. Now some Arizona couples are pushing for change. Also, a climatologist gives us the latest drought picture across the Southwest.

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Fronteras Desk
1:56 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Drone Testing Starts In Texas

Engineers check over the RS-16 before it’s set for launch. This process can take at least an hour.
Joey Palacios TPR News

Fronteras: A university research team in Texas was one of six teams selected by the FAA to begin testing drones, but not everyone is keen on the idea. A little-known stretch of desert in southern New Mexico is the site of a proposed national monument but some fear its proximity to the border may invite illegal traffic. And a developer in Arizona embarks on an urban renewal project in a poor Phoenix barrio but how will this impact the area’s rich Latino past?

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Fronteras Desk
1:20 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Navajo Communities Face Water Poverty Crisis

Lindsay Johnson has had to conserve water most of her life. It's a happy day when the water lady fills her barrels.
Laurel Morales Fronteras

Fronteras: Most Americans use more than 100 gallons of water a day, but in Smith Lake, New Mexico, on the Navajo Nation, they use seven. As industries develop farther into remote areas, they run into conflicts with tribes who view certain sites as sacred New York City's "stop and frisk" law has been controversial because of the potential for racial profiling and in San Diego, activists say the same thing is happening.

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Fronteras Desk
1:58 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Replay: All Things Taco

A bacon, egg, potato, and cheese taco.
Joey Palacios TPR News

Fronteras: Remember those hard-shelled, spicy ground beef tacos that populated American kitchens a few decades ago? That's not the taco of today. Today it's grilled fish, kosher beef, Korean barbeque and fried eggs. We’re talking all things taco: From the evolution of the taco and how breakfast tacos are a morning staple close to the heart in South Texas, to Kosher tacos and tacos in the Navajo Nation.

*This show is a replay of the August 23, 2013 episode of Fronteras.

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Fronteras Desk
11:47 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Border Agents Can Search Your Computer, But Is There A Limit To What They Can Look At?

Chris Eudaily TPR News

Fronteras: In the New Year, Mexico will begin to implement a sweeping tax reform, but northern border communities are protesting the change. U.S. border inspectors have the right to look through your computer when you come into the U.S., but just how closely can they look into your files? Cookie-cutter housing developments for low-income workers are now a feature of many cities in Mexico, but the model isn’t working out. American tax dollars are helping change lives in Mexican border cities by putting people to work in the formal economy.

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Fronteras Desk
11:51 am
Fri December 20, 2013

What New Mexico Is Doing To Curb Drug Abuse

A example of a Naloxone rescue kit given out by the Department of Health.
Tristan Ahtone Fronteras

Fronteras: What are the prospects for immigration reform next year? Fronteras looks at how New Mexico is dealing with its drug addictions and future efforts to curb drug abuse. In the Southwest, wildlife relocations have proven successful in bringing back populations of some species, but sometimes those relocations come at a steep price. Also, California's DREAM Act has started providing financial aid for undocumented students.

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Fronteras
9:05 am
Fri December 13, 2013

Declining Fertility In America Worries Economists, Could Immigration Reform Offer A Solution?

The majority of respondents, 89 percent, said they had experienced “a little” to “a great deal” of discrimination.
Tom Wong UC San Diego

A survey of Latinos in San Diego County finds that many face discrimination. Fewer Americans are choosing to have children. Some experts say this could have disastrous effects for the country's economic future. We speak to an International Bank of Commerce official who says America will need to import more workers to fill job shortages. When photographer Wes Naman invited friends to pose for a series of what was meant to be goofy portraits, neither he nor his models had any idea the images would end up reaching millions of people across the globe. More on why this Albuquerque artist's photos of distorted faces went viral.

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