Fronteras

Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a Texas Public Radio program that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, Fronteras provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics, and the environmental landscape.

Norma Martinez

In 2010, public schools in Arizona were forbidden from teaching Mexican American studies to their students.  A group of Republican state lawmakers there argued that the classes created resentments towards other races, and even in some cases, promoted the overthrow of the U.S. government.  A U.S. District Court judge is expected to rule on the ban’s constitutionality in the coming days.

Educators in Texas are looking past the Arizona controversy and are working to teach public school students about Hispanics’ often-overlooked role in shaping American history. 

Texas Public Radio’s Norma Martinez sat down with Marco Cervantes, director of the Mexican American Studies Program at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Lilliana Saldaña, Associate Professor in Bicultural-Bilingual Studies at the UTSA College of Education and Human Development.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

This week on Fronteras:  

  •  Fort Worth citizens opposed to SB4 – the new sanctuary cities law – turn out by the hundreds to protest against it.
  • In San Diego, refugees claim resettlement workers told them to falsify rent applications.
  •   Americans who own maquilas, factories in Mexico, welcome the prospect of positive change for NAFTA.
  •  Eleven immigrants become U.S. citizens at Fort Davis historic site in West Texas.
  •  A daughter reflects on growing up with her artist father, Juan O’Gorman, a master of mosaics and murals.

 

Joey Palacios / TPR

  This week on Fronteras: 

 

  • Horror unfolds as immigrants seeking a new life die overcome by extreme heat in the back of a trailer truck in San Antonio.  The Mexican government steps in to help the survivors.
  •  Human smuggling and human trafficking are two very different crimes.
  •   A look at how horses are effectively helping agents patrol the border in the Rio Grande Valley.
  •  A veteran activist serving two causes creates a show merging gay rights and Chicano history.  
  •  Using once segregated public swimming pools at a place for integrated audiences to enjoy dance performance art.

 

Lorne Matalon

This week on Fronteras: 

  •  Increasing danger for journalists covering organized crime across the border in Mexico.
  •  Environmentalists file against the U.S. government claiming President Trump’s border wall will harm endangered species.
  •   Are confederate monuments a symbol of racism?
  •  Performer and social activist Irma Herrera makes the case for respecting the pronunciation of a person’s name.
  •  For refugee students, getting through school can be tough.  That’s why a Dallas couple says they’re helping kids in their neighborhood.

 

Al Ortiz

  

This week on Fronteras:  

 

 

  •  Harris County votes to stay out of the SB4 lawsuit despite vocal citizen protests.
  •  An Iraqi national who came here for a better life and helped the U.S. military during the war faces deportation in New Mexico.
  •   An exhibit in San Diego highlights items precious to refugees who fled their war torn nations.
  •  San Antonians get a new look at a huge rediscovered mosaic by a Mexican artist that had not been in plain sight until recently.

 

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