Fronteras

Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

"Fronteras" is a Texas Public Radio program exploring the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, "Fronteras" provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics and the environment.

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Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras we look at issues of legal immigration, and a new art exhibit that pays tribute to Latino culture.

  • Representatives from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services talk about evolving immigration law and how it affects the application process for legal entry into the U.S. (0:00).
  • Artist Analy Diego’s new exhibit “Latino Faces” is a pop-art tribute to the contribution of Latinos around the world (16:27).


Marlon Lizama

Despite a strong Hispanic presence, not much Mexican-American history is being taught in public schools along the border — that is, until now.  

  • On this episode of Fronteras, students in El Paso are learning more about a previously unknown chapter of history (0:17).
  • Also on this episode, a SpaceX facility in Brownsville has yet to be completed but residents there are worried if the company’s promises of a launch facility will go unfulfilled (5:34).
  • And finally, Houston poet and performer Marley Lizama talks about how his mother’s unconventional punishments led him to poetry, and how hip hop helped him find his voice (10:57).


Marlon Lizama

Houston poet and performer Marlon “Marley” Lizama discovered his love of the spoken word through hip hop. His group Havikoro is made up of dancers, poets and authors, and they have traveled the world sharing their culture with international audiences.

St. Mary's University

Erica Schommer is an immigration lawyer and clinical assistant professor at St. Mary’s School of Law. She has practiced law with Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, and has worked on various human rights issues in Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica.

Schommer says immigrants who are victims of crime often have a better chance of achieving legal status in the U.S. The Violence Against Women Act, for example, allows abused women to petition for legalization.  


Mallory Falk

A Colombian undocumented immigrant, living in the U.S. for 20 years has spent the last 10 months living with a Franciscan community in New Mexico.  On this episode of Fronteras, we look at the difficulty of living under the persistent threat of deportation (0:00).

Then we explore immigration laws in the U.S. and how it evolves from administration to administration — from the detention of families to the denial of bail to certain detainees (12:33).


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