Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

"Fronteras" is a Texas Public Radio program exploring the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, "Fronteras" provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics and the environment.

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Elma Gonzalez

This week on Fronteras:

  • A look back on the effects of the Trump administration’s U.S.-Mexico border policies in 2017.
  • How a San Antonio artist is transforming a busy neighborhood intersection with a sculpture that has meaning for its residents (8:41).
  • An American Indian author and illustrator takes children on an adventure in his new book (14:24).
  • Latina superheroes serve as role models to inspire young girls (18.27).

Marten Holdway / / Pixabay Creative Commons

This week on Fronteras:

  • The rich history of tamales.
  • Remembering a Pearl Harbor hero in Waco (12:56).
  • Ballet dancer lives the American dream performing “The Nutcracker” (15:37).

Mallory Falk

This week on Fronteras:

  • Rural West Texans scramble to try to find affordable health care. 
  • Border Patrol finds Guatemalans freezing at border (4:54). 
  • The Los Angeles Times uncovers corruption in Mexico’s housing developments (5:47). 
  • At a border reunion, a 14-year old boy gets an endearing birthday present (15:46).

Erik Anderson

This week on Fronteras:

  • In California, Border Patrol agents are getting sick from sewage spills in the Tijuana River.
  • A language barrier often exists between patients and their doctors  (7.02).
  • A high profile Hispanic throws her hat into the ring for Texas governor (12.57).
  • Mariachi music makes its way out of the cantinas and into the classrooms (17.27).

Photo courtesy of The Refuge Ranch.

This week on Fronteras:

  • Human trafficking is an international crime, but Texas authorities are learning to understand it as a local atrocity.
  • The fight to get Mexican-American studies in public schools (6:18).
  •  How a family divided by the U.S.-Mexico border struggles to keep a sense of normalcy in their lives (16:20)