Fronteras

Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

"Fronteras" is a Texas Public Radio program exploring the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, "Fronteras" provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics and the environment.

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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

  

This week on Fronteras:   

  •  With SB4 just days away from becoming law, an Austin non-profit gives lessons in how to respond to police inquiries about immigration status.
  •  A deported DACA student has his day in court.
  • A look at the help available for undocumented students at UTSA.
  •  A new study reveals the high stress levels of Texas children who worry their parents might be deported.
  •  A special ceremony to forgive Mexico’s colonial past brings together Apaches and other first nations from both sides of the border. 

Public Domain

This week on Fronteras. 

  •   South Texans say the president’s border wall is affecting them before it’s even built.
  • San Antonians demonstrate for and against removing a Confederate monument from a downtown park.
  • Listening helps foster racial understanding in Austin.
  • Truck driver indicted in human smuggling deaths.
  • Texas Gulf coast residents sue a large plastics plant saying it’s polluting their water.
  • A look at cultural rituals and myths attached to the celestial phenomenon of a solar eclipse.

 

Norma Martinez

On Fronteras:  

  • The importance of including accurate Mexican-American history in school curriculums.
  • An Austin bar shuts down a Latino DJ group for playing Latin music.
  • Two North Texas artists are working to beautify the image many people have about life on the Texas/Mexico border.   

Norma Martinez

In 2010, public schools in Arizona were forbidden from teaching Mexican American studies to their students.  A group of Republican state lawmakers there argued that the classes created resentments towards other races, and even in some cases, promoted the overthrow of the U.S. government.  A U.S. District Court judge is expected to rule on the ban’s constitutionality in the coming days.

Educators in Texas are looking past the Arizona controversy and are working to teach public school students about Hispanics’ often-overlooked role in shaping American history. 

Texas Public Radio’s Norma Martinez sat down with Marco Cervantes, director of the Mexican American Studies Program at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Lilliana Saldaña, Associate Professor in Bicultural-Bilingual Studies at the UTSA College of Education and Human Development.

Christopher Connelly / KERA News

This week on Fronteras:  

  •  Fort Worth citizens opposed to SB4 – the new sanctuary cities law – turn out by the hundreds to protest against it.
  • In San Diego, refugees claim resettlement workers told them to falsify rent applications.
  •   Americans who own maquilas, factories in Mexico, welcome the prospect of positive change for NAFTA.
  •  Eleven immigrants become U.S. citizens at Fort Davis historic site in West Texas.
  •  A daughter reflects on growing up with her artist father, Juan O’Gorman, a master of mosaics and murals.

 

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