Fronteras

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a collaborative regional news project that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Central Texas to Southern California, and from Las Vegas to the Mexican border, Fronteras brings emphasis to Latino and Native American life and border issues affecting American politics, social order, economics and the environmental landscape.

DEA

On Fronteras:

- Law enforcement personnel in San Diego County say the marijuana business is putting children in danger. But marijuana advocates say officers are being alarmist.

-What is it like for international students who leave everything behind in search of a good education in the U.S.? We hear from Chinese students who are new to Texas.

- The Border Patrol is looking for a few good women, and has completed its first recruitment drive directed at women.

-Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides talks about her favorite Mexican-American foods this time of year. Warning: This story could cause severe cravings!

Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras:

-- While recent studies have shown that the brain is not an immutable object and can learn and relearn skills post a critical childhood window, there is no doubt that a conducive environment and starting young profoundly impacts a person’s ability to learn, think and process information. This includes language. Educators in Grand Prairie in North Texas talk about the district’s growing dual language program.

-- There’s been plenty of talk of trying to regulate sodas and other sugary drinks to combat obesity. Mexico has already been taxing sugary drinks for almost a year now, and the tax seems to be producing positive results.

-- We now have a better idea of where the Central American minors who came to the U.S. alone earlier this year in droves, ended up. Pew Research Center gives us an update.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA News

On Fronteras:

-- Can local ranchers and farmers export water from under their land, especially to Mexico, at a time when the U.S. suffers through some of its driest times ever? We look at a water rights case in Texas.
-- State Republican leaders are gearing up to battle President Obama’s executive order on immigration in a variety of ways, beginning with a lawsuit challenging the legality of the action, by Attorney General Gregg Abbott.
-- Groups in San Antonio are trying to help people make sense of the President’s immigration orders. They’re also trying to ensure people don’t become victims of immigration fraud.
-The popular StoryCorps MobileBooth is in Dallas. Dallas County Sheriff, Lupe Valdez, shares the story of her first election, and how she felt she had to beat the odds to win.

Crystal Chavez

On Fronteras:

-- Diego Mancha is a UT San Antonio student. His mother brought him to this country illegally as a child. About two years ago, Diego was granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — or DACA — status. He says it changed his life. We’ll hear his story.

-- We’ll also meet a North Texas high school student from Guatemala, who’s juggling school and work. It’s worth it all to her, as she’s getting a fresh start after escaping violence back home.

-- Also, Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides shares childhood memories of Thanksgiving Day. She tells us about the interesting way her father scored the family table’s centerpiece.

Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras:

-- President Obama has kept his promise. He took executive action on the nation’s immigration laws. We get reaction from San Antonio, Texas.

-- Anguish is mounting over the Mexican government’s response to the collective murders of 43 college students. The protests aren’t letting up and there’s a sense that this incident has started a movement that is going to stick.

-- We’ll hear how one school district in north Texas is educating a growing number of immigrant children, whose primary language isn’t English.

-City Heights could be San Diego’s “richest-poor” neighborhood. There’s been decades of philanthropic investment there. Two foundations have spent more than a quarter of a billion dollars in City Heights since 2000. So what's become of all that money? Are its residents better off?

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