Fronteras

Fridays at 12 noon and Sundays at 9 p.m.

"Fronteras" is a Texas Public Radio program exploring the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Texas to New Mexico and California, "Fronteras" provides insight into life along the U.S.- Mexico border. Our stories examine unique regional issues affecting lifestyle, politics, economics and the environment.

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Laura Skelding / Texas Tribune

The Texas State Board of Education voted on April 13 to create curriculum standards for a Mexican-American studies course based on an existing course taught in the Houston Independent School District.

While this could be considered a victory for activists calling for Mexican-American studies in Texas schools, in making the decision, the majority of the board approved a last-minute name change. Instead of Mexican-American Studies, the course would be called Ethnic Studies: An Overview of Americans of Mexican Descent.

San Antonio native and SBOE member Marisa Pérez-Diaz joins us to discuss the board's decision.


WIKIMEDIA COMMONS | http://www.rarenewspapers.com/view/603874

On Fronteras:

  • Researchers are looking into how to raise awareness about rising rates of cancer in the Latino population (0:15).
  • Texas schools are teaching students about slavery, but the curriculum doesn’t reflect how it affected the course of U.S. history (12:04).
  • In 1968, high school students at San Antonio’s Edgewood High School walked out of class and changed how public schools were funded (15:02)


Natalie Krebs

On Fronteras:

  • For one day each year, the borders are erased between Lajitas and Paso Lajitas, Mexico (0:15).
  • A recent graduate from the University of Texas at San Antonio shares her story of moving to San Antonio to escape war-torn Syria (6:55).
  • We go on a tour of San Antonio’s Westside. It’s one of the poorest parts of San Antonio, but it’s rich in culture (11:30).


Natalie Krebs

Every year in the tiny border town of Lajitas —  located about 300 miles east of El Paso — hundreds gather to celebrate, remember and protest the closing of the area’s border passage.

For decades, U.S. tourists and locals used to cross freely over the Rio Grande into Pasos Lajitas, Mexico. But that changed in May of 2002, when the federal government abruptly closed the informal passage. The small community Lajitas shared with its Mexican neighbor was cut in half.

http://www.mariachiflordejalisco.com/

This week on Fronteras:

  • Texas counties report an increase in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement transfers in the first months of the Trump administration (0:16).
  • A group in El Paso assists immigrants in detention with bond payments (1:53).
  • San Diego looks into how new immigrants can integrate into society (7:44).
  • Local mariachis prepare for a marathon evening of Mother’s Day serenades (9:48).


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