Here and Now on KSTX

Weekdays, Noon
Robin Young

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a424e1c82ad60e1e78db|5182a41de1c82ad60e1e78d2

Pages

NPR Story
3:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Dean Of Boston Sports Journalism Celebrates 42 Years On The Job

Jonny Miller and Robin Young (Robin Young)

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 3:04 pm

One of the most-beloved sportscasters you’ve probably never heard of is Jonny Miller.

He’s covered professional sports in Boston for 42 years for CBS powerhouse, WBZ Radio.

He’s called the Helen Thomas of the local sports press corps, because he always gets to ask the first questions.

And he’s earned the respect of players and sports writers, because he does it all, while living with cerebral palsy.

Here & Now’s Robin Young profiles Miller and his long career.

Read more
NPR Story
3:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Business Roundup: From Stocks To The Dollar

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 25, 2014 in New York City. US stocks saw their biggest downturn since July. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

U.S. stocks posted their biggest one-day drop since late July, amid concerns about global growth.

China is signaling it won’t undertake more aggressive stimulus measures and Europe’s economy is showing more signs of sluggishness.

Bloomberg News’ Michael Regan speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shift.

Read more
NPR Story
3:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

After Huge Debut, A Tough Week For Apple

In this photo taken on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, people wait to buy the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices outside an Apple store in Hong Kong. The Apple's new devices were released on Friday in Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia and Japan. (Vincent Yu/AP)

It started out so well.

Thousands — no millions — of people lining up to buy the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus.

On Monday, Apple made an announcement: More than 10 million phones sold. A company record.

The new phones are bigger than previous generations; the 6 plus sports a 5 1/2 inch screen.

But that was part of the problem.

Read more
NPR Story
2:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

The Lawyer Who Would 'Stop At Nothing To Win'

Lawyer Steven Donziger, left, walks with his clients who are members of Ecuador's indigenous Cofan tribe to Federal Court in New York for their hearing with lawyers for Texaco Monday, Feb. 1, 1999. The Ecuadorian rainforest was polluted by Texaco oil drilling. (Adam Nadel/AP)

Bloomberg Businessweek senior writer Paul Barrett chronicles the 20 year long legal battle waged by human rights lawyer Steven Donziger in the book, “Law of the Jungle: The $19 Billion Legal Battle Over Oil in the Rain Forest and the Lawyer Who’d Stop at Nothing to Win It.

Donziger won compensation for Ecuadorian tribes whose land was polluted by Texaco oil drilling, but he then lost everything when the oil company sued him for dirty tactics.

Read more
NPR Story
2:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

How To Translate Good Science Into Good Copy

Physicist Christina Love talks about her PhD thesis on dark matter at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Center City Philadelphia. She organized the event called "Start Talking Science"(Susan Philllips/WHYY)

The chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, told delegates at the opening ceremony of the UN Climate Summit in New York today that the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report – compiled by hundreds of scientists – had three key findings:

One: Human influence on the climate is clear and growing.

Two: Quick and decisive action is needed to avoid destructive outcomes.

Three: There are means to limit climate change. That language is pretty simple and clear.

Read more
NPR Story
2:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

What Will Be The Impact Of New Inversion Rules?

The Treasury Department has issued new rules governing corporate inversions after calls from President Barack Obama for "corporate patriotism." Obama is pictured here walking with Treasury Secretary Jack Lew (who was at the time the White House Cheif of Staff) on March 2, 2012. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Following through on a populist appeal from President Barack Obama for a new era of “corporate patriotism,” the Treasury Department stepped in Monday with new regulations designed to limit the ability of U.S. firms to seek refuge in lower tax countries.

The Treasury will make these so-called corporate inversions less lucrative by barring creative techniques that companies use to lower their tax bill. Additionally, the U.S. will make it harder for companies to move overseas in the first place by tightening the ownership requirements they must meet.

Read more
NPR Story
3:52 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Terry Gilliam Goes Back To The Dystopian Future

Director Terry Gilliam (R) on the set of his new film, "The Zero Theorem." (Amplify)

In the new film “The Zero Theorem,” director Terry Gilliam gives us a dystopian yet fantastically colored and absurd future that will seem very familiar to fans of his films “Brazil” and “Twelve Monkeys.”

That’s no accident, Gilliam tells Here & Now’s Robin Young.

When he first read screenwriter Pat Rushin’s script, it was clear that Rushin had seen every film he’d made.

Read more
NPR Story
3:52 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Robots On The Dairy Farm

Nate Tullar shows off his Lely robotic milker at Tullando, his family farm in Orford, New Hampshire. (Charlotte Albright/VPR)

In a bygone era, if you wanted milk from a cow, you had to get it by hand.

Then came machines that a farmer would attach to a cow’s udder to pump out the milk.

These days, on more and more farms, robots are doing that chore, resulting in lower labor costs, increased yields, and better knowledge for farmers about the health and productivity of their herds.

From the Here & Now Contributor’s Network, Vermont Public Radio’s Charlotte Albright has the report.

Read more
NPR Story
2:32 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Unable To Vote, Scottish Americans Watching Closely From Afar

A selection of the British National Newspaper front pages are displayed on September 18, 2014 in London, England. Scots abroad are unable to vote in the Scottish referendum, but are watching closely as the vote unfolds today. ( Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Across Scotland today, people are headed to the polls to vote on a simple, but momentous question: Should Scotland be an independent country?

Only those currently living in Scotland are eligible to cast ballots, but many Scots living abroad are watching closely — along with the rest of the world.

Jack Crombie, who moved to the U.S. from Scotland 30 years ago, is the co-owner of the Duke of Perth, a Scottish pub in Chicago.

Read more
NPR Story
2:53 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Federal Reserve Will Keep Interest Rates At Record Low

The Federal Reserve is signaling that it plans to keep a key interest rate at a record low for a considerable period because a broad range of U.S. economic measures remain subpar.

The Fed says it plans to keep its benchmark rate near zero as long as inflation remains under control, until it sees consistent gains in wage growth, long-term unemployment and other gauges of the job market.

Additionally, the Federal Reserve announced that it will stop buying bonds to prop up the US economy.

Read more

Pages