Itinerarios was a weekly two-hour radio program featuring music and musicians from throughout Latin America.  Music by the acknowledged masters of Mexico, South and Central America and the Caribbean Islands was presented in a free-flowing session which also features performers with Latin American affiliations.

These world class artists bring a distinctive interpretive power to the music of Latin America, and the great body of European music.  A typical edition of Itinerarios might place an interpretation of Beethoven played by the Mexican pianist Jorge Federico Osorio alongside the guitar music of Paraguayan composer Augustín Barrios performed by the Welsh guitarist David Russell.

Itinerarios aired on KPAC and KTXI from the fall of 2003 to January 2013.  Although the show has ceased production, you may still access previous playlists and articles associated with the show online through this page.

Miguel del Aguila

  Miguel del Aguila's website describes him as "An internationally recognized compositional voice and talent, Miguel del Aguila creates fresh, spontaneous music often colored by Latin and World Music idioms, and with a healthy respect for the classical tradition and form. What results is a captivating interplay of classical balance and romantic excess.

We often speak of certain Brazilian composers suffering in the shadow of Heitor Villa-Lobos. After all, he was the one who possessed not only musical genius, but also the ability to attract attention.

He was, in many ways, bigger than life, which made it a struggle for other very able composers to be seen and heard. These others included Camargo Guarnieri, Franciso Mignone and Claudio Santoro. The music of these composers is still struggling to be heard outside of Brazil.

Cuarteto Latinoamericano

In many ways, KPAC and the Cuarteto Latinoamericano have lived parallel lives over the past 30 years. San Antonio's cultural profile would be quite different today if not for KPAC's dedication to providing great music around the clock for the greater San Antonio area. For these same three decades, the Latin American String Quartet has emerged as the essential champion of Latin American music for string quartet. Long may both these cultural institutions survive.


 Last year (2012) was a Mexico-wide -- and even international -- year of reflection upon the life and career of the Mexican composer and conductor Eduardo Mata. He would have been 70 years old, if not for his tragic death, much too young, in 1995.

James Baker

It was 10 years ago that I met the remarkable Mexican soprano Olivia Gorra, at the 2003 Festival Internacional de Cervantino. She had just made her Metropolitan Opera debut in Turandot, with more performances to come.

The pride of Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, Olivia performed an outdoor program at Guanajuato's Alhondiga which was capped off by a rousing set with her fellow Veracruzanos, the folkloric ensemble Tlen Huicani. Despite her numerous opera house successes, I doubt she has ever had them dancing in the aisles at the Met.