Live At Jazz TX

Saturdays, 7 p.m.

The culture of South Texas and America's great gift to the world, jazz music, come together each week on "Live At Jazz, TX," as Nathan Cone and Doc Watkins host an hour of great music, recorded live at Jazz, TX at the historic Pearl Brewery. On-stage and backstage interviews offer insight into the music and performers, and sometimes there's even a magical surprise (kind of like a Cracker Jack prize, but on the radio)!

JacoTen / Wikimedia Commons

The soulful playing of Red Young on Hammond organ will sweep you up on this week’s “Live At Jazz, TX.” Young says the instrument reminds him of the human voice, with its high tremolo. (Give a listen about 16 minutes into the show to hear him explain it.)

Though he’s a master of jazz and blues, Young’s musical interests were piqued as a boy in Fort Worth.

This week’s “Live At Jazz, TX” features Curtis Calderon, a San Antonio native who began his musical career playing in Tejano bands before heading full-on into jazz. After some early recording in the Alamo City in the late 1990s, Calderon spent 15 years as a member of the legendary vocal group The Four Freshmen starting in 2001, which kept him on the road often. He recently stepped away from that traveling gig to plant himself back home full-time.

Guitarist Devan Jones brings his swinging jump blues sound to Jazz, TX on this week’s program. Originally from Tennessee, Jones is now based out of Austin, and says he found the city to be a welcoming place for his style.

“Puerto Rico is known for a couple of things,” says Jose Amador, founder of NATIAO Latin Jazz. “One of them is rum.  So obviously, you mix rum with this kind of music, and you have no choice—dancing is mandatory!”

For Doc Watkins, playing in a trio vs. the big band he runs brings a unique set of challenges and opportunities.

“With the piano trio, there's a vast palette of colors that you can try and capture with the sounds of brushes or sticks on the drums, or floor toms, or "arco" on the bass (with a bow) to the way that you harmonize a melody, to the way that the melody is presented in the first place. I feel as a trio we're just getting to the point where we really are wanting to step out and try and explore all the possibilities of that particular format.”

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