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Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Thu January 8, 2015

Congressional Republicans Take Another Swing At Obamacare

House Speaker John Boehner answers questions during a press conference at the U.S. Capitol Wednesday. The House is debating changes to the Affordable Care Act's employer mandate.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 4:08 pm

Update at 5 p.m. E.T.: The House of Representatives passed this legislation on Thursday afternoon. It now heads to the Senate.

Taking a swing at President Obama's biggest policy achievement, the Affordable Care Act, is at the top of the agenda for the new Republican Congressional majority.

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Thu January 8, 2015

Environmentalists Push To Keep Canadian Crude In The Ground

An excavator loads a truck with oil sands at the Suncor mine near the town of Fort McMurray in Alberta, Canada in 2009. Environmental groups that oppose oil sands mining have pointed to delayed and canceled projects as a sign of recent success.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 8, 2015 10:29 am

The Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry crude oil from Canadian oil sands down to the U.S. Gulf Coast, isn't just an infrastructure project. It's also a symbol for the fight over the future of energy.

Producing oil from Alberta's tar sands emits more pollution than traditional oil drilling, so many environmentalists want that crude left in the ground. And more broadly, they want the world to turn away from climate-changing fossil fuels toward cleaner forms of energy, like wind and solar.

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Media
10:49 am
Wed January 7, 2015

For 'Charlie Hebdo,' A History Defined By Humor, Controversy — And Cartoons

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

News
9:03 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Between Speech And Religion, Freedoms Often Spell Friction

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
6:43 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Gunmen Storm Satirical Magazine's Office In Paris

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 12:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
6:00 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Oregon, Ohio, Wants You To Know They Are Buckeye Fans

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:54 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Man Who Didn't Want His Name In A News Story, Is Now A Story

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:33 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Should Minnesota Bid Adieu To The Midwest, Hello North?

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 6:50 pm

Copyright 2015 Minnesota Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.mpr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Economy
4:37 am
Wed January 7, 2015

Greek Opposition Party Seizes On Anger Over Austerity Measures

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:35 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:07 am
Wed January 7, 2015

That's So Joe: How The Senate Swearing-In Became Must-See TV

Vice President Joe Biden takes a selfie with Sen. Jeanne Shaheen's grandson A.J. Bellabona during Tuesday's ceremonial swearing-in ceremony.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 11:35 am

Administering the oath of office to the U.S. Senate sounds like a mundane job. That task falls to the vice president.

But the current occupant of that office, Joe Biden, turns it into an event that's so joyful, and so lacking the partisan rancor that typically dominates American politics, that it's almost hard to believe that you're watching a scene from Washington.

Every two years, a third of the U.S. Senate is elected — and there's a formal oath-taking on the Senate floor. But then, right afterward, each senator takes his or her turn in a ceremonial swearing in.

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