The Source

Monday - Thursday from noon-1 p.m. on KSTX

The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to call and connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.

The Source seeks to give life, context and breadth to the events and issues affecting San Antonio by bringing newsmakers and experts to the public, and highlighting the people being affected by the news of the day. Hosted by veteran journalist David Martin Davies, and produced by Kim Johnson and Jan Ross Piedad.

Tune in to The Source for insightful discussion and analysis on topics that matter to residents of the Alamo City.

Support for The Source comes from contributors to the Community Engagement Fund, including The Gladys and Ralph Lazarus Foundation.

Contribute to the conversation:

  • Call us at: (210) 614-8980 during the show
  • Leave a voicemail at (210) 615-8982 anytime. Submissions may be played on-air
  • Tweet questions to:  @tprsource
  • E-mail comments to:  thesource@tpr.org

Got an idea for a show or want to suggest a must read? CLICK HERE 

Be sure to note if you have extensive experience or expertise on a particular show topic and include your phone number as we may call you for more information on your comment or story.

Ways to Connect

Public Domain / Pixabay

At least 1 million of the nation's 8 million minority-owned firms are based in Texas, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Pixabay

The results of the 2016 presidential election prompted many Americans to question the electoral college – a winner-takes-all system which empowers a group of 538 electors to name the next president of the United States.

Pixabay http://bit.ly/2yudQV0


Pixabay http://bit.ly/2xi7nrn

The first step toward educational success is showing up.

A study of San Antonio schools shows 15% of students were "chronically absent" during the 2015-2016 school year, accounting for 45% of all absences. Chronic absenteeism is defined as missing at least 10 percent of the school year, or 18 days in a 180-day school year.

Courtesy MOVE San Antonio

A state voter registration law enacted 34 years ago by the Texas legislature is seeing scant results, largely due to low participation by the same institutions the policy aims to target: high schools.    

The little-known law addresses voter registration for eligible students – teens at least 17 years and 10 months old – and requires Texas high school principals or designees to provide voter registration information at least twice a year.

According to the Texas Civil Rights Project, six percent of high schools asked the Texas Secretary of State's office for voter registration applications in 2016. Only 198 of the state's 1,428 public high schools indicated that they requested forms, while none of the estimated 1,800 private schools across the state reported making the same request.

"Participation in our High School Voter Registration Initiative is crucial to the future of our state and the health of our democracy," Secretary of State Rolando Pablos said in a statement. "I welcome any valid input from community stakeholders and seek to work with organizations whose priorities are educating students on their civic duties and empowering them to vote, rather than engaging in misplaced political campaigns."

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