The Source

Monday - Thursday from 3-4 p.m. on KSTX

The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to call and connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.

The Source seeks to give life, context and breadth to the events and issues affecting San Antonio by bringing newsmakers and experts to the public, and highlighting the people being affected by the news of the day.

Tune in to The Source for insightful discussion and analysis on topics that matter to residents of the Alamo City.

Support for The Source comes from contributors to the Community Engagement Fund, including The Gladys and Ralph Lazarus Foundation.

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Be sure to note if you have extensive experience or expertise on a particular show topic and include your phone number as we may call you for more information on your comment or story.

The Source: Author J.R. Helton's Fact-Based Fiction

Apr 9, 2015
Cover art by Robert Crumb

  

No story is completely fiction. Writers draw on their own lives and experiences to create realistic and meaningful stories. But what happens when the boundary between fact and fiction is less clear?

Writer J.R. Helton is the author of multiple books, including Below the Line and Drugs, both about his life experiences. His most recent novel, The Jugheads, explores his own family’s past. 

  

http://bit.ly/1NWL7EI

That diet soda you thought was helping you lose weight might be doing the opposite, according to a new study from the University of Texas Health Science Center.

After examining 749 adults across the city, the San Antonio Longitudinal Study on Aging, a study that has spanned multiple decades, found that consumption of diet soda was linked with increases in waistlines in senior citizens.

Credit: Wikicommons http://bit.ly/1dIFHuI

The EPA has a reputation as a liberal, green agency working towards conserving our natural resources. But how true is this assumption?

Author E.G. Vallianatos worked for twenty-five years at the EPA, which he says he loves, but is not afraid to criticize. In his book Poison Spring, Vallianatos asks if the EPA shouldn’t be renamed the “Polluter Protection Agency.” Due to scientific evidence indicating high rates of pollution in today’s world, that criticism raises important questions.

California towns have been running out of water for the past 6 months. A plan to ration water in southern California is expected to be voted on next week.

The Source: Changing Conceptions of Adulthood

Apr 7, 2015
Credit: Wikicommons http://bit.ly/1N523Oo

  

 When does childhood end and adulthood begin? 

Complaints that modern generations are more childlike than their predecessors are common--but UT History professor Steven Mintz argues that this is a good thing. His new book, The Prime of Life: A History of Modern Adulthood, explores the trend towards Peter Pan-youth.

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