StoryCorps South Texas

Fridays at 4:45 p.m., Saturdays at 8:35 a.m.

StoryCorps South Texas presents the oral histories of our community. Recorded at the StoryCorps mobile booth, each story is archived at the Library of Congress, and select interviews are broadcast on TPR News stations.

StoryCorps visited San Antonio in February, 2018 to record stories for its Military Voices Initiative. Broadcast of select stories will begin on TPR later this spring. Stories from previous StoryCorps visits may be heard below. Local production of StoryCorps is sponsored by USAA, esd a digital marketing agency, and Monterrey Iron & Metal.

About StoryCorps: ​StoryCorps’ mission is to provide people of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share and preserve the stories of our lives. We do this to remind one another of our shared humanity, to strengthen and build the connections between people, to teach the value of listening, and to weave into the fabric of our culture the understanding that everyone’s story matters. At the same time, we are creating an invaluable archive for future generations.

StoryCorps

“What do you mean, ‘it’s not in the grooves’?” Vikki Carr remembers asking her record label, incredulously, after they balked at releasing the song “It Must Be Him” as a single.

“How could a guy sitting behind a desk know that [the song] wasn’t going to make it? I was the one dealing with the audience,” Carr says, noting the standing ovations she got every night in the 1960s.

Carr continues, “There are things in your heart you have to fight for.”

Sure enough, “It Must Be Him” became a number 3 pop hit and number one easy listening hit in 1967.

StoryCorps

“Believe it or not, the best [English] teacher I had was the radio station,” says 88-year-old Edgar Fischel, “because they repeat so much!”

Fischel came to America from Costa Rica as a teenager. A self-described troublemaker in school, he grew up to be a respected educator and school administrator in San Antonio. Now retired, he spends his time building houses--little ones… as you’ll hear in this edition of StoryCorps South Texas.

StoryCorps

"She's my hero," says Laura Wolfe of her daughter, MacKenzi. Born with medulloblastoma, Macky--as her parents call her-- has been in and out of doctors' offices for most of her life. But what Wolfe remembered most when she visited the StoryCorps Mobile Booth were not the trials Macky has endured, but an example of grace.

Texas Public Radio

When the StoryCorps Mobile Tour came to San Antonio recently to collect personal stories to be archived at the Library Of Congress, it was a chance for Julian Ledesma to share with his best friend, Michelle Dueñas, the story of the unusual way his family learned he was gay.  

"My sister and I created this forceful, loving bond and didn’t fight because we had a difficult childhood. We were just trying to figure out what we were going to eat that day." 

StoryCorps

“Being a teenager is tough, in and of itself,” says Marcus Barnes. “But struggling with my sexuality and not being comfortable with it… I went through some tough times as a teenager. I [am] also a person of color. I was so uncomfortable with myself for whatever reason.”

Barnes saw the Marines as a way to maybe, just maybe, fix all of that.

“You drive down the street, you see a billboard of a Marine… you see the uniform, and this steely-eyed look on their face, and I just thought, ‘I want that.’”

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