StoryCorps South Texas

Fridays at 4:45 p.m., Saturdays at 8:35 a.m.

StoryCorps South Texas presents the oral histories of our community. Recorded at the StoryCorps mobile booth, each story is archived at the Library of Congress, and select interviews are broadcast on TPR News stations.

Local production of StoryCorps is sponsored by ESD Digital Marketing, and also made possible by Monterrey Iron & Metal and Codeup.

About StoryCorps: ​StoryCorps’ mission is to provide people of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share and preserve the stories of our lives. We do this to remind one another of our shared humanity, to strengthen and build the connections between people, to teach the value of listening, and to weave into the fabric of our culture the understanding that everyone’s story matters. At the same time, we are creating an invaluable archive for future generations.

Texas Public Radio

When the StoryCorps Mobile Tour came to San Antonio recently to collect personal stories to be archived at the Library Of Congress, it was a chance for Julian Ledesma to share with his best friend, Michelle Dueñas, the story of the unusual way his family learned he was gay.  

"My sister and I created this forceful, loving bond and didn’t fight because we had a difficult childhood. We were just trying to figure out what we were going to eat that day." 

StoryCorps

“Being a teenager is tough, in and of itself,” says Marcus Barnes. “But struggling with my sexuality and not being comfortable with it… I went through some tough times as a teenager. I [am] also a person of color. I was so uncomfortable with myself for whatever reason.”

Barnes saw the Marines as a way to maybe, just maybe, fix all of that.

“You drive down the street, you see a billboard of a Marine… you see the uniform, and this steely-eyed look on their face, and I just thought, ‘I want that.’”

StoryCorps

The StoryCorps Mobile Booth recently traveled to San Antonio to collect personal stories that will be archived at the Library of Congress. It was an opportunity for Mary Pritchard and her teenage daughter Samantha to talk about a difficult time, when Mary had to tell five-year-old Samantha that her father had died. 

"You just stared straight ahead out that floral window, and you smiled. And I remember thinking, 'Does she understand?'"

A Close Call Over Hanoi

Feb 26, 2016
StoryCorps

“The biggest hazard is trying not to hit other airplanes,” says Dwight “Crow” Wilson, 78.

Wilson, an Air Force veteran, visited the StoryCorps Mobile Booth with his daughter, Anne Savidge, 49, to talk about flying missions during the Vietnam War. The low altitude led to some dangerous situations. “You’re watching all the time. Your head’s on a swivel and your eyes are everywhere,” Wilson explains. 

In the audio above, Wilson talks about the time he was almost shot down by a fellow service member, and what happened when he met the man later on.

Pages