Talk of the Nation on KSTX

Neil Conan

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's live, midday news-talk program. Host Neil Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape.

From breaking news, science, and education to religion and the arts, Talk of the Nation offers listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academics, and artists from around the world.

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Books
1:46 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

The Key To Zen For Tony Bennett: 'Life Is A Gift'

Legendary singer Tony Bennett has won 17 Grammy Awards. He had his first No. 1 hit in 1951 with the song "Because of You."
Marion Curtis AP

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 1:36 pm

At 86, legendary singer Tony Bennett says he's at the top of his game and more passionate than ever about his art.

"I want to try to prove that at 100, I could sing as well as I was singing when I was 45 or 43," he tells NPR's Neal Conan. "I'd like to prove that if you take care of yourself, you can actually not regret the fact that you've become an old-timer, but you can just still improve and actually get better."

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Iraq
1:13 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

'The Long Walk' To Defuse A Ticking Bomb

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 2:08 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

If you saw the movie "The Hurt Locker," you probably can't forget that scene at the start where a soldier puts on an 80-pound Kevlar suit and takes the long, lonely walk to diffuse an unexploded bomb. True enough, according to Brian Castner, but life as a bomb tech involves a great deal more, rushing in to investigate the scene of a bloody car bomb even as grieving relatives pull out the pieces of their loved ones and also ordering someone else to don the bomb suit and take that lonely walk.

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Digital Life
1:12 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

The Aesthetics Of First-Person Shooter Video Games

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 3:29 pm

First-person shooter games have become more cinematic and aesthetically pleasing over the years and dominate the video game industry. Stephen Totilo, editor in chief of online video game publication Kotaku, explains the appeal of point-and-shoot games.

Africa
1:08 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

Conflict In Congo Escalates, Goes Largely Unnoticed

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 1:36 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Congolese rebels today captured the city of Goma, as government troops melted away and U.N. peacekeepers stood by. And if that sounds a bit like deja vu, you may be remembering a similar battle on the same ground four years ago, or parts of other wars that have ravaged the eastern part of Congo for nearly two decades now, wars blamed for the deaths of five million over those years, along with a long list of associated crimes including systematic rape, looting and child soldiers.

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Movie Interviews
1:31 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Sally Field Captures History In Role Of Mrs. 'Lincoln'

To prepare for her role in Lincoln, Sally Field traveled and researched Mary Todd Lincoln, and even put on 25 pounds.
DreamWorks

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 11:56 am

In Steven Spielberg's film Lincoln, Academy Award-winning actress Sally Field plays Abraham Lincoln's emotionally tormented wife, Mary Todd Lincoln.

Field lobbied hard for the role and did extensive research to capture the complex first lady, who modern observers believe may have suffered from bipolar disorder. Field immersed herself in biographies and books about the era, and visited Mary's home and collections of Lincoln memorabilia.

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Middle East
1:14 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

The New Landscape Of Middle East Conflict

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 8:50 am

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jennifer Ludden, in Washington, Neal Conan is away. Conflict between Israel and Gaza continues for a sixth day, as Israel has responded to a barrage of rocket fire from Hamas with air strikes and missiles fired by the Israeli navy. More than 90 Palestinians have been killed and three Israelis. Israel has called up tens of thousands of reservists in case of a possible ground invasion.

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Around the Nation
1:01 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

When Older Siblings Step Into Parents' Shoes

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 1:42 pm

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Jennifer Ludden, in Washington. When a parent is deported, goes to prison or passes away, an older child may step into the role to keep the family together. In an instant, thoughts of prom dates and sports matches are replaced with worry about finding work and paying bills.

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Opinion
1:01 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Working On Thanksgiving?: Reasons To Be Grateful

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 1:42 pm

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:01 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Searching For 'The Particle At The End Of The Universe'

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 2:02 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Why does stuff have mass, you know, that gives it weight? If you're a regular listener, you might recall that it has to do with how subatomic particles interact with something called the Higgs Field, right? Higgs boson, becoming more familiar? How do scientists know that? Well, it's theory. It's backed up by, in part, by the reported discovery of the Higgs Boson at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, back in July.

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NPR Story
11:01 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Are We Getting Dumber? Maybe, Scientist Says

Originally published on Fri November 16, 2012 2:02 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Turn on reality TV, and it may not be long before you ask yourself: Are we getting dumber? A new study may have some genetic answers to that question. Provocative research published this week in the journal Trends in Genetics suggests that human intelligence may have peaked thousands of years ago.

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