Texas Matters

Fridays at 3:30 p.m., Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., and Sundays at 9:30 p.m.

Texas is a big state with a growing, diverse population and as the population grows, the issues and challenges facing its residents multiply.  Texas Matters is a statewide news program that spends half an hour each week looking at the issues and culture of Texas.

Texas Matters is hosted by David Martin Davies, who talks directly with policymakers and newsmakers in a lively discussion designed to shed light on issues often overlooked by other media.

David Martin Davies:

Davies is the host of "The Source" and a veteran journalist with over 20 years’ experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. He is a regular contributor to NPR and American Public Media's "Marketplace." Davies also has written for "The San Antonio Light", "The San Antonio Express-News," "The Texas Observer" and others, and hosted KLRN public television’s interview program "Conversations."

Texas Matters is made possible by the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures.

Joseph Henry “T Bone" Burnett was born in St. Louis but grew up in Fort Worth, and has had a far reaching influence on the Texas “Third Coast Music” scene – but also in modern rock – country – Americana – and film – TV sound tracks.

Burnett is a musician, songwriter, producer and activist for musicians to be paid for their work in the digital age.

The night of December 6th 1991 – Four girls – ages 17, 17, 15 and 13 were working and hanging out at a “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt!” store in Austin.

Eliza Thomas, Amy Ayers and sister Jennifer and Sarah Harbison were forced to strip, they were tied up, they were murdered – the shop was set on fire and the case is unsolved.

25 years after that night – it’s still a deep dark mystery.

“Who Killed These Girls? Cold Case: The Yogurt Shop Murders” explores in rich detail the kills and the flawed prosecutions of four suspects.

Texas is known for its writers of almost every genre – but maybe not so much for its writers of horror. And that could be seen as an oversight. The Texas talent pool has it’s dark side. And there is so much about the lone star state that is lurking in the shadows – and haunting the recesses of our minds.

The current leading Texas horror writers are collected in a new anthology called “Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers.”

Austin-based author, Elizabeth Harris, brings us the story of a woman who is the victim of a violent act.  In Mayhem: The Three Lives of a Woman, protagonist, Evelyn Kunkel Gant does indeed live three lives. She is daughter, wife, and then, as a victim of sexual assault, a pariah—one who never receives any kind of compassion or vindication—except through the telling of her story.  Elizabeth Harris takes us to the rural Texas of the 1930s—a place immersed in gender and social expectations that bring no sympathy to Evelyn.

Texas joined the Confederacy on March 2, 1861.  About 70,000 men from Texas then joined the rebellious fight to preserve slavery. The women who stayed behind also did their part for the lost southern cause. 

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