Texas Matters

Fridays at 3:30 p.m., Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., and Sundays at 9:30 p.m.

Texas is a big state with a growing, diverse population and as the population grows, the issues and challenges facing its residents multiply.  Texas Matters is a statewide news program that spends half an hour each week looking at the issues and culture of Texas.

Texas Matters is hosted by David Martin Davies, who talks directly with policymakers and newsmakers in a lively discussion designed to shed light on issues often overlooked by other media.

David Martin Davies:

Davies is the host of "The Source" and a veteran journalist with over 20 years’ experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. He is a regular contributor to NPR and American Public Media's "Marketplace." Davies also has written for "The San Antonio Light", "The San Antonio Express-News," "The Texas Observer" and others, and hosted KLRN public television’s interview program "Conversations."

Texas Matters is made possible by the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures.

Thursday Sandra Cisneros received the National Medal of the Arts, the highest honor given for achievement in the arts. Cisneros said she accepted the medal to honor her family and all other hard working Mexican Americans.

Sandra Cisneros said she briefly thought about turning down the trip to Washington D.C. to accept the National Medal of the Arts.

“At first I wasn’t sure if I should go. I just started a new book and I wanted to be home writing, ” she said.

What could be more Texan than Tacos? Tacos are a favorite food but where are the best tacos?

And how did tacos become a culinary super star that it is today?

Certainly this wasn't always the case. For generations tacos were considered a food of the underclass and not appropriate for polite society.

But tacos have arrived.

Mando Reyo calls himself a taco journalist and with Jarod Neece has written the book “The Tacos of Texas.”

It’s published by the University of Texas Press.

This week the State House Select Committee on State and Federal Power and Responsibility heard invited testimony on Governor Greg Abbott’s plan to make major fundamental changes to the United States Constitution.

On this Labor Day, a look back to 50 years ago – a labor fight, a strike and a legendary march for better wages, improved working conditions and human dignity for farm workers.

On June 1, 1966, farm workers in Starr County in the Rio Grande Valley, virtually all of them Latino, left the melon fields.

They did the unimaginable and went on strike.

They were demanding a $25 dollar-an-hour wage, and improved working conditions, including clean drinking water.

From Texas Standard:

When Sam Espinosa was a kid, it took a while for Austin Independent School District to learn he was homeless.

"My mom is a fairly private person – she was never one to let anyone else into,  you know, what we were going through," Espinosa says.

So, Sam and his five siblings became fairly good at pretending they had a place to live.