Texas Standard

Weekdays, 10 a.m.

From fascinating innovations that reshape technology to shifting demographics that transform the nation, from political leaders to pop culture icons – what happens in Texas drives the American narrative. So why let New York, Washington and Los Angeles shape our sense of the world? 

Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering crisp, up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines.

 

The one-hour daily news magazine is grounded in the best traditions of American journalism: fact-based, independent and politically neutral reporting. In an era in which news outlets, politics and citizens are increasingly polarized, Texas Standard offers critical breadth, variety and integrity.

 

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions.

 

Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States.

Meet The Grass That’s Eating Southeast Texas

Dec 12, 2017

From Texas Standard.

In southeast Texas, farmers and ranchers are trying to eradicate a kind of grass that’s taking over the landscape. But it’s not working.

On a warm December morning in Colorado County, halfway between Austin and Houston, the sun is shining on a maroon pasture, thick with waving, waist-high grass.

“I mean that’s pretty. ‘Mhmm.’ That’s as pretty as you’d ever want to see,” says Gary Thomas, who raises cattle nearby.

From Texas Standard.

The deadline for Texas candidates to file to run in the 2018 primaries was Monday. And if you’ve been trying to keep up with the latest rash of Congressional retirements and scandals, plus what’s turned out to be a pretty crowded field of Democratic gubernatorial candidates, you may be wondering how to sort through all of the noise.

The Austin American-Statesman’s Political Editor Bob Gee highlights five Texas races that are worth a closer look.

From Texas Standard.

A six-year-old class action lawsuit over the system of foster care in Texas may be reaching a climax. It’s the case in which a federal judge found Texas’ foster care system to be so dangerous to foster kids as to be unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Janis Graham Jack has called the system that cares for some 10,700 kids “broken.” Now, court special masters are making recommendations that are sure to attract pushback from the state of Texas, which has been aggressively privatizing the foster care system.

Robert Garrett of the Dallas Morning News reports Texas could be forced by the court to recruit thousands of foster parents, as the crisis in child protective services continues.

From Texas Standard.

The FCC is expected to vote this week on whether to repeal Obama-era rules that made net neutrality the law of the land.

Put simply, net neutrality means that internet service providers like Verizon or AT&T, can’t prioritize one kind of content over others. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who is championing the repeal, says regulating the internet in this way stifles innovation. In fact, if the rollback is approved, the FCC would have very little to say about what happens on the Internet. That has sparked protests in Houston and Dallas, and though they haven’t exactly brought traffic to a standstill, the potential  rollback because of what it could mean to users of the Internet, as well as those who build their businesses there.

From Texas Standard.

Earlier this year there were fears that the 32-year-old health care system that covers hundreds of thousands of retired teachers was approaching a death spiral. The Teacher’s Retirement System’s TRS-Care was expected to experience a shortfall in excess of $1 billion.

Lawmakers came to the rescue with an infusion of cash – a temporary patch intended to shrink the system’s deficit to $700 million. But now, the Austin American-Statesman reports on another threat to the program – retired teachers are leaving it in droves.

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