Texas Standard

Weekdays, 10 a.m.

From fascinating innovations that reshape technology to shifting demographics that transform the nation, from political leaders to pop culture icons – what happens in Texas drives the American narrative. So why let New York, Washington and Los Angeles shape our sense of the world? 

Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering crisp, up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines.

 

The one-hour daily news magazine is grounded in the best traditions of American journalism: fact-based, independent and politically neutral reporting. In an era in which news outlets, politics and citizens are increasingly polarized, Texas Standard offers critical breadth, variety and integrity.

 

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions.

 

Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States.

From Texas Standard.

Summer is coming. The kids are about to get out of school, and that means trips to the pool. In Texas, there is one pool that stands above the rest – the pool at Balmorhea State Park, a true desert oasis. Generations of Texans have gone west to cool off in the spring-fed pool near the foothills of the Davis Mountains. This year, there’s a problem, though.

From Texas Standard.

Last week, one writer described the hysteria and and hype in Houston right now as on a scale somewhere between anticipation for the Super Bowl and the new Avengers movie. So to say Houstonians and Texans further afield are pumped for what starts Monday night in Space City may be an understatement as the hometown Rockets take on the Golden State Warriors in the first game of the NBA’s western conference finals.

From Texas Standard.

It was a cold rainy day back in February 2016 outside NFL headquarters in New York. Media crews were fluttering about in anticipation of a protest much buzzed about on social media. It would be a demonstration against Houston-born Beyoncé's halftime performance at the Super Bowl, which was memorable for costumes echoing those used in the 1960s by the Black Panthers and dance moves which included raised fists.

From Texas Standard.

For a lot of Texans, knowing what to do during a tornado warning is second nature, because when you live in Tornado Alley, you know how deadly and destructive twisters can be.

For many weather professionals and hobbyists, too, Tornado Alley is ground zero for researching some of the nation’s deadliest natural disasters, and a ticket to the greatest thrill ride on Earth.

From Texas Standard.

Out in the sand dunes of west Texas, a tiny lizard has been wrapped up in a big controversy for years. The four-inch long dunes sagebrush lizard calls the middle of the Permian Basin home, but conservationists have long feared the oil boom there would be detrimental to the lizard’s rare habitat. But in the past year, a new threat has emerged.

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