Abortion

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., has ruled that a detained teenage immigrant may not obtain an abortion until a government-approved sponsor can be secured by the end of the month.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit split 2-1 on the ruling.

Ryan E. Poppe

A federal appeals court has overturned a judge’s ruling that would have allowed an undocumented pregnant teen to get an abortion.  The unaccompanied minor is currently being held at an immigration detention center near Brownsville.

The case centers around a 17 year old undocumented pregnant teen labeled “Jane Doe.”  She attempted to get an abortion after being detained by federal immigration agents in Texas. This sparked a fierce legal argument over whether undocumented minors should be able to have an abortion while in the US.

A federal judge temporarily blocked an anti-abortion law set to take effect in Texas on Friday that would have limited second trimester abortions in that state.

U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel issued an injunction lasting 14 days that prevents Texas from outlawing an abortion procedure known as dilation and evacuation, commonly used on women seeking to terminate their pregnancies in their second trimester.

From Texas Standard:

Rhetoric from lawmakers on both sides of the abortion debate raged on at the state Capitol on Tuesday over a Republican bill that would require women to pay a separate health insurance premium to get coverage for abortions that are not deemed medical emergencies. The bill is one of several abortion-related measures making headway during this legislative special session.

State Reps. Donna Howard (D-Austin) and John Smithee (R-Amarillo), the bill's author, hold opposing viewpoints on the proposed legislation, and each provide a sample of their parties' position on the bill.

How Election Day Chaos Hurts Texas Voters 

Long wait times, confusion about voter ID and questions about voter registration – these are just three of the barriers that potential voters ran into during the last November General Election.

That’s according to a new report from the Texas Civil Rights Project, a voting right advocacy group.

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