aging

The Source: Changing Conceptions of Adulthood

Apr 7, 2015
Credit: Wikicommons http://bit.ly/1N523Oo

  

 When does childhood end and adulthood begin? 

Complaints that modern generations are more childlike than their predecessors are common--but UT History professor Steven Mintz argues that this is a good thing. His new book, The Prime of Life: A History of Modern Adulthood, explores the trend towards Peter Pan-youth.

Kevin McGee http://bit.ly/1jxWtiE

  When people see a Naked Mole Rat, they don't see an animal whose genetic make-up could hold the keys to longevity. They see an objectively ugly creature, if such a thing exists. The Barshop Institute at University of Texas Health Science Center studies these animals genetics because they seem to be impervious to many poisons, live more than 7 times longer than their mice cousins and don't develop cancers. 

What can we learn from other animals genetics for our own existence? What are some future research opportunities to extend life?

Robert Fludd / Public domain (copyrite expired)

In the first segment:

Your "senior moment" -- forgetting where your keys are -- reciting the wrong child's name -- is the result of normal aging, but what makes up normal is defined by what makes up you -- that is to say your genes affect the way your brain declines.

Studying extended families, the Texas Biomedical Research Institute and Yale University published a study showing just how much that decline is influenced by your genetics.

Barshop Institute

The UT Health Science Center has a new leader for its studies on aging. Dr. Nicolas Musi was recently named as director for the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies and said he plans to encourage research to move into clinical studies.

Musi said he wants to create a comprehensive program that moves the research from the lab to the bedside. One area he’s eager to study on human subjects is exercise interventions.

In the first segment:

In the book "Smoke Signals," Martin A. Lee traces the history of cannabis from the counter-culture movement of the 1960s to the multi-billion dollar industry it is now. With states like Washington and Colorado decriminalizing the plant, what does this mean for Texas?

In the second segment: