airlines

Ask anyone "How was your flight?" and you'll likely hear some kind of complaint: It was late, my luggage was lost, there was no legroom.

And it appears that more airline passengers are not just sounding off to friends and family, but are filing official complaints with the government.

New figures from the U.S. Department of Transportation show a large increase in the number of consumer complaints against airlines last year, even as the airlines are showing slight improvements in on-time performance and how well they provide other services.

For Airlines, How Much Is Passenger Happiness Really Worth?

Nov 24, 2015

From Texas Standard:

Thanksgiving is just a few days away and many would-be passengers are hoping airlines will be trying to make the holiday flying experience somewhat less unpleasant. According to a new study by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), however, it looks like happy customers don’t really make airlines any more profitable.

Stepping off his recent flight from Boston at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport, education consultant Debashis Sengupta looked a little surprised.

"The flight today was actually quite nice," says Sengupta. "No problems at all, in fact — not something I was expecting from United."

This frequent flier says an uneventful, on-time flight on United is the exception, not the rule.

The chief executive and two senior officials resigned yesterday from United Airlines, amid a federal investigation into whether the airline gave favors to the chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

United began a direct flight between Newark, New Jersey, and Columbia, South Carolina, where the former head of the Port Authority, David Samson, has a vacation home. The route began while he was chairman and ended after he resigned last year. At the same time, United was in negotiations with the Port Authority over airport projects.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Pages