Alzheimer's disease

DennisM2 via Flickr Creative Commons

The Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing of genetic testing for the health risk for 10 diseases. The Alzheimer’s Association says don’t count on it to tell you the risk of developing that particular memory-robbing disorder.

Think Science: Memory

Feb 17, 2017
Disney/Pixar

What happens to us when something… happens? How do humans make memories, and where do they go in our brains? Does the mind work like a filing cabinet, or is it more like your computer’s hard drive? And what happens to the brain when memory starts to fail? These are some of the questions we asked of two panelists at our lunchtime discussion, Think Science: Memory.

Where Does Alzheimer's Treatment Go From Here?

Dec 29, 2016

In a disappointment to Alzheimer's patients and researchers, drugmaker Eli Lilly said in late November that a clinical trial of solanezumab, an experimental medication to treat the degenerative neurological condition, had failed.

What rats can remember may help people who forget.

Researchers are reporting evidence that rats possess "episodic memories," the kind of memories that allow us to go back in time and recall specific events. These memories are among the first to disappear in people who develop Alzheimer's disease.

The finding, which appears Thursday in Current Biology, suggests that rats could offer a better way to test potential drugs for Alzheimer's. Right now, most of these drugs are tested in mice.

A living history museum usually conjures up images of butter churns and anvils. At Den Gamle By (The Old Town) Museum in Aarhus, Denmark, you'll find all that. But tucked away in one corner of this museum, there's also something different — an entire apartment straight out of the 1950s.

The "House of Memories" is not usually open to the public, and it's not aimed at schoolchildren sent to learn about a distant and exotic past.

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