American Homefront Project

The American military is getting smaller. The number of veterans is getting larger. And life is changing both for people in uniform and those who've left the service.

The American Homefront Project is reporting on military life and veterans issues. We're visiting bases to chronicle how American troops are working and living. We're meeting military families. We're talking with veterans -- in their homes, on their jobs, at school, at VA hospitals -- to learn about the challenges they face.

We cover major policy issues at the Pentagon and Veterans Administration, and we report on the family issues that service members and veterans experience in their daily lives. From the youngest military recruits to the veterans of World War II, we're reporting in-depth stories about Americans who serve.

Major support for the American Homefront Project comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, as part of CPB's ongoing effort to expand coverage of local, regional, and national issues.

Additional support comes from the Bob Woodruff Foundation, dedicated to ensuring that post-9/11 injured service members, veterans, and their families make a successful transition.

 

President Trump's directive prohibits transgender people from joining the military and bans the military from paying for gender reassignment surgery. But it doesn't address what will happen to transgender people currently serving.

Human error is likely to be among the causes of two separate collisions involving Navy destroyers. The accidents killed 17 sailors.

In the Vietnam War era, Americans became more interested in recovering missing troops -- largely because of the activism of some military families.

More than a week after Hurricane Maria, the Air Force continues daily medical evacuation flights from St. Croix. Patients are heading to South Carolina, Georgia, and elsewhere.

Military C-130 and C-17 aircraft have been outfitted with medical equipment, as the Air Force flies patients to hospitals in the mainland U.S.

Pages