Eileen Pace / TPR News

The city has initiated a push today to microchip pets.

It is the equivalent of a dog’s wallet or a cat’s purse. The microchip technology identifies each animal with its name, pet owner, address and phone number so it can be returned in case its gets lost in the future.

The Playhouse

Casting is nearly complete for a local Playhouse production. But there's still a part un-cast.

“We are really excited," said Christina Casella, the education and outreach director for The Playhouse. "And who wouldn’t be? It’s 'The Wizard of Oz.' "

I asked her how the development of  special effects was going.

"The show opens in October, but they have already started working with the pyrotechnics and the smoke," Casella said. "They’re really excited; I think they’re having too much fun up there.”

Then we moved on to casting.

It's prairie chicken mating season!

Still, it's tough being a lesser prairie chicken these days. This type of grouse once spanned an enormous area, though now they survive mainly in pockets of Oklahoma and Kansas. Their numbers are plummeting; in 2012, the population dropped by half.

But after they were recently listed as a threatened species by the U.S. government, complaints of federal overreach and lawsuits have followed.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

An increasing number of abandoned newborn kittens have been reported across the city, and the Animal Defense League is putting out a call for fosters to help take care of them.

ADL spokesman Hugo Vital said the younger kittens have strained resources at the no-kill shelter. 

"Like in the case of three kittens that were just surrendered to us, they will require feeding every two to three hours,"Vital said. "It's almost like having a newborn baby in your home. They're going to require a lot more attention on a regular basis."

San Antonio Zoo

The San Antonio Zoo has hosted tens of thousands of visitors over spring break. One reason may be the newly-constructed Zootennial Plaza that has everyone talking. 

A hundred years ago, in 1914, San Antonio had a big hole in the ground where the zoo and Brackenridge Park are now located. San Antonio Zoo spokeswoman Debbie Vanskike said the area was a quarry, and the planners of the day were visionaries who were ahead of their time.

“They had a vision that include conservation, education and recreation,” Vanskike said.